Virtual Interviews: Tips for Jobseekers and Employers

11 Tips for Virtual Interviews

Virtual interviews have become increasingly common, including with state government agencies in Austin, TX. Before COVID-19, Peak Performers had been transitioning to conducting mostly virtual interviews because of their convenience for all parties. Now, living with the virus, you will find most employers, including Peak Performers, are conducting their interviews via phone or video chat or some combination of the two. Let’s look at some tips for both jobseekers and employers:

  1. Treat it like a normal interview. It’s important to take all interviews, regardless of how they are conducted, with the same level of seriousness. Preparation includes: studying before you interview (jobseekers should research the organization, employers should re-read the candidate’s resume), getting plenty of rest the night before, being well fed before the interview, and cleaning/dressing yourself professionally
  2. Mark your calendar. Prior to the event, make sure that you are prepared to do the interview. You should send out or respond to calendar invites to let the other party know it’s really happening. As an additional courtesy, you can send an email expressing your excitement and providing the other party with another means to contact you if there is connection trouble.
  3. Check technology. Test out the technology to make sure you are set-up and ready to go. If possible, make a test call to a friend or family member. In particular, you should make sure that your webcam and microphone work.
  4. Manage noise. Find yourself a quiet room in your home (not outside). Sounds like a dog barking, garbage disposal running, or someone playing music in the next room may not be something you notice but your interviewer probably will. If you’re concerned about background noise, wear a headset or earphones.
  5. Manage lighting. Find a room with good natural light when possible. Avoid sitting with your back to a window as this tends to turn you into a silhouette. Use overhead lights when natural light is unavailable or insufficient.
  6. Adjust your webcam. Adjust the angle of your webcam so that your head is centered in the frame and the camera clearly shows both your shoulders. Sit so you are directly facing the camera.
  7. Manage interruptions. Don’t forget to silence your phone and computer so it doesn’t interrupt you. Additionally, put a sign on your door and let household members know that you will be interviewing. If interruptions do happen during the interview, such as a child coming in to interrupt you, mute your microphone, deal with the situation patiently, thank the other party for their patience, and return to the interview. We’re all human and working under unusual circumstances—do what you need to do and then get back to it.
  8. Take notes. For employers this is really important, especially if you’re interviewing multiple candidates and need to recall who is who. Jobseekers should also have a pen and paper handy to take note of their interviewer’s name, email, and phone for follow up.
  9. Speak clearly. Remember to talk slower than you might do in person, especially if you are conducting a phone interview. Pause before answering a question to think about it and avoid, when possible, excessive filler words. You want to sound thoughtful and communicate clearly.
  10. Smile often. Remember to smile often, even if you are doing a phone interview. A smile brings a natural enthusiasm to your voice and is particularly important with a video interview.
  11. Look at the camera, not the screen. Finally, when doing a virtual interview, look into the camera as much as possible when talking. This gives the perception of eye contact during the interview.

Peak Performers’ Co-CEO, Bree Sarlati, Recognized Globally by Staffing Industry

Austin, TX – Bree Sarlati, Co-CEO of Peak Performers, was recognized by the Staffing Industry Analyst’s annual “40 under 40” list. Founded in 1989, Staffing Industry Analysts (SIA) is the leading global advisor on staffing.

These 40 professionals exemplify passion, integrity, creativity and the perseverance that is needed to connect people to new opportunities amid COVID-19 and beyond,” from SIA’s website.

Bree started with Peak in 2012 and has worked in every part of Peak’s business: payroll, marketing, recruiting, staffing, and office management. Bree joined the leadership team in 2017 and under her leadership, she has lead a series of organizational transformations and grown Peak’s book of business by 40%.

In spite of these troubled times, Peak Performers is a success story: we are a local, medium-sized business that continues to grow and offer much needed jobs to hundreds of people,” Bree commented after the award.

Peak Performers was started in 1994 by Bree’s father, Charlie Graham, who now shares her title as Co-CEO. Peak assists over 60 government agencies and last year employed over 770 people in temporary and temporary-to-permanent positions. Peak Performers employs people in administrative, professional, accounting, and information technology jobs.

Peak has been most recently assisting the Texas Workforce Commission in recruiting for dozens of roles to help with the processing of unemployment claims during the COVID-19 crisis.

Peak Performers is a rare nonprofit staffing firm: there are only a handful of similarly structured organizations in the country. As part of their nonprofit mission, Peak is setting a new standard of employment for people with disabilities and chronic medical conditions by helping them get professional roles. Skilled job seekers with ADA-qualifying conditions receive job priority for Peak’s positions and over 80% of their workforce have an ADA-qualifying condition. Peak’s vision is two-fold: to change what it means to be a job seeker with a disability, and to challenge the preconceptions that make employers reluctant to hire someone with a disability.

Our mission now is especially important. In the best of times, people with disabilities experience an unemployment rate double that of the national average. That’s why we’re committed to helping people succeed through meaningful employment opportunities,” said Bree.

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Media contact: myles@peakperformers.org – (512) 453-8833 X 116

Austin Job Seeker Resources

Peak Performers is an active part of the recruiting and job seeking community and connected to many organizations and resources that may help job seekers find work. Here is our curated list of Austin job seeking resources:  

General Job Seeker Services

Workforce Solutions is the operational arm of Texas Workforce Commission in providing various job seeker services. Peak Performers does not provide job seeker services and will usually refer job seekers onto Workforce Solutions.

You can turn to Workforce Solutions for services such as:

  • Unemployment benefits
  • Free or discounted training and education opportunities
  • Workplace accommodation resources
  • Childcare assistance services
  • Resume and interview coaching 
  • Career coaching

http://www.wfscapitalarea.com/Job-Seekers

NEW! In response to the sudden rise in unemployment, Workforce Solutions has launched a “Jobs Now” website, which is a manually curated list of jobs that are still hiring despite current market conditions.

Additionally, they hold job fairs periodically throughout the year:

  • Bi-weekly general job fairs
  • Industry-specific job fairs
  • Public sector job fairs
  • Disability-focused job fairs
  • Second chance job fairs
  • Veterans job fairs

http://www.wfscapitalarea.com/CalendarEvents

Note: currently job fairs are suspended due to outbreaks in the COVID-19. The workforce centers are available via appointment only. This article will be updated when the job fairs are back in session. In the meantime, this link gives you a quick jumping off point to find services and get help.

There are multiple locations in the Austin area, and they’re open 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday. They accept walk-ins and appointments for job seekers with specific needs.

  • 9001 N Interstate Hwy 35 Ste 110, Austin, TX 78753 (North Austin)
  • 575 Round Rock W Dr Building H, Suite 240, Round Rock, TX 78681 (Round Rock)
  • 3401 Webberville Rd #1000, Austin, TX 78702 (East Austin)
  • 7701 Metropolis Dr, Austin, TX 78744 (South Austin)

Recommended Job Seeker Websites

There are a lot of websites out there to help job seekers find work and much of your time is going to be spent utilizing these resources. Gone are the days of walking into businesses and dropping off your resume at the front desk. “Help wanted” signs now hang in the digital window.

You should use all or many of these websites to aid your job search. Generally, these websites are free to job seekers and require minutes to start an account.

ZipRecruiter – this platform has taken the recruiting world by storm as it does a great job of proactively finding jobs that may be a fit and inviting you to apply. It is also pulls jobs from hundreds of other websites and centralizes them in one place.

Monster – this platform is used by many recruiters for its advanced search features. It also tends to attract many professional and information technology job seekers. From an employer side, the cost is rather daunting but that tends to attract larger employers looking for hard-to-find candidates.

Dice – this is widely used in the Austin information technology job search community. Dice tends to attract mid and senior -level professionals.

WorkInTexas – this is used in Texas by Workforce Solutions to post jobs. Jobseekers filing for unemployment will be required to build a profile….but take time to do it right—many job seekers don’t fill in all the information! Savvy recruiters use this website because it’s free and because it’s a snap shot of nearly all job seekers available, not just the ones who have their resume up on other platforms.

Glassdoor – jobs are posted to Glassdoor but perhaps more important are the tools to read company reviews and explore salaries. Glassdoor is an important part of your research toolkit so that you spend time engaging with reputable companies.

NEW! Austin Chamber of Commerce – in response to the COVID-19 unemployment crisis, the Austin Chamber of Commerce has launched a listing of businesses in Austin who are still hiring. Great for doing some research and discovering companies that you haven’t heard of before.

Austin Job Clubs

Job seeking can be demoralizing, especially if you’re told “no” over and over. It can be valuable to join a community of other job seekers to keep you motivated and to offer guidance along the way. Fortunately, Austin metro area has three prominent job clubs which you can become involved in. They will often feature speakers, job fairs, and resume workshops. These are free to attend—they ask for donations from previous job seekers and from employer sponsorships.

Job Seekers Network – Meetings in Northwest Austin every Monday

HIRED Texas – Meetings in Round Rock every Tuesday

LaunchPad Job Club – Meetings in North Austin every Friday

Note: currently job clubs are suspended due to outbreaks in the COVID-19. This article will be updated when the job clubs are back in session.

Additional Job Seeking Resources

Here is a list of common resources that I refer people onto who are looking for work:

AustinUp is a local nonprofit that connects older adults (ages 50+) with employers seeking experienced professionals. AustinUp also partners with AARP in order to connect older adults with a host of other services. AustinUp has periodic job fairs throughout the year as well as regular meetings.

Austin Urban League is a local nonprofit that seeks to help African Americans and other under-served urban residents with job training, housing programs, and education.

Texas Veterans Commission supports Texas veterans and their spouses who are looking for work and other services. Texas Veterans Commission career advisors work out of Workforce Solutions offices.

Dress for Success helps disadvantaged women by providing professional attire, a network of support, and career development resources.

Austin Community College Employment Readiness Training is a “boot camp” to help job seekers get ready to look for work. Perfect for those who have not looked for work for a little while and are feeling overwhelmed.

Need Help?

Recruiter Open Office Hours: In an effort to continue to assist the job seeking community, Peak Performers is now offering digital open office hours once a week with recruiter Myles Wallace. Having trouble with your resume or want to know who is hiring in Austin right now? Thursdays 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. (subject to change due to scheduling). These sessions are completely free and open to the community so drop by for 10-15 minutes to ask your burning recruiter questions. Sign up online for next week’s session! https://forms.gle/zSCm2z1wgPLbMziR8

Top Reasons Public Sector Uses Temporary Workers

As the outside recruiter and business development representative for Peak Performers, I spend a lot of time at recruiting events and vendor fairs. At these events, I am often asked by people why public sector entities (state agencies, federal government, city and municipalities, transit authorities, and education organizations) use staffing agencies. There’s actually a lot of answers to this question. Here are some reasons the public sector has increasingly grown to rely on a temporary and contingent workforce to run their operations.

They Can’t Find People with the Right Skill Sets

First and foremost, professional staffing agencies exist to fill a need and that need is very often for roles that the client themselves cannot find the right people for. A large state agency has many things to do besides recruit. Staffing agencies spend most of their time doing primarily that. They are also exposed to a wider pool of qualified candidates because they regularly advertise jobs, attend recruiting events, and build up a robust referral network. The sheer activity of recruiting naturally pulls in more candidates than they can use, and many of those candidates may be fits for other jobs the recruiting firm has.

It’s also important to note that public sector entities generally have a more complicated application process which discourages many job seekers. Job seekers who do make it through their process also typically wait longer to hear back from the employer. In this lag time, they are more likely to find another job and move on. Staffing agencies offer a lower barrier to entry and move faster to recruit and onboard candidates than the public sector can.

They Don’t Have the Budget for a Full Time Employee

Agencies often have a strictly allocated budget that dictates not only how much they can spend but how they can spend it. This budget has separate amounts allocated for full time employees versus temporary employees. Budget for temporary personnel may even come out of a miscellaneous budget area where there are extra funds. Budget for temporary personnel may be project-based as well and have not only a fixed amount of dollars but a fixed amount of time.

While on the surface it may seem cheaper to hire a full-time employee from the start, many clients find this is not the case. So why would you pay a company to recruit and hire for you at a markup when you could have done it yourself?

First off, the cost of employees are usually the single largest cost for every organization–and what you pay them is only the beginning of that cost. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that the cost of any employee’s benefits package 31% of their total cost to the employer. That means that if you pay an employee $34.50 per hour, the true cost of that employee is $50 per hour. Given this cost, it actually makes decent economic sense to pay a staffing company a markup fee.

This also doesn’t factor in the unseen costs that go into hiring: the cost of staff time to recruit and interview candidates, the cost of training employees, and the cost of making a bad hire. The Center for American Studies estimates the average turnover cost to be around 50% of the annual salary. In other words, if you pay an employee $34.50 an hour (about $71,760 annually) you pay on average $35,880 for a bad hire. Ouch.

“Try Before You Buy”

Recruiting is expensive. The cost of making a bad hire is also expensive. When an employee is let go shortly after starting, organizations eat the time and cost of recruiting, interviewing, onboarding, and training said employee. (That’s not accounting for intangible costs if the employee hurt the organization, damaged morale, or hampered productivity.) Then the recruiters have to start over with no guarantee the next person will be better.

For this reason, many organizations have embraced “try before you buy” hiring, also known as temp-to-perm hiring. In this approach, the client brings on the new employee on a temporary basis and hires them as a full time employee after a trial period. Meanwhile, all the aforementioned costs are incurred by the recruiting firm. Risks are minimized as well.

Many organizations will try out an employee using this method if they are unsure if their own intention is to hire them on full time. They have a “let’s wait and see” approach to determine if the project is important enough to justify the cost and if they really need that position filled for the long term.

All Work is Temporary

The Department of Labor recently estimated that 20% of all workers work on a temporary basis. Even without factoring in the “gig economy” that is now so pervasive, more workers are choosing to work on a temporary basis and more employers are seeking them out that way.

Even for full time workers, the increasing market trend is pointing towards the average worker staying in their job for 2-3 years. Thus, we might argue: all work is, in effect, temporary.

Similarly, organizations are structuring their personnel in order to most efficiently accommodate cycles in work. We often say “staff for the peaks, not the valleys.” What we mean by this is that there are usually cycles of work that are going to be lighter during certain parts of the year. We find what works best is that the customer maintains internal staff for the “valleys” of the year and then bring on temporary staff for the “peak” work times when they are busier than usual.

Practical Guide to Hiring People with Disabilities

After reading a recent article from the Society of Human Resource Management, we at Peak Performers were reminded of just how much fear and misunderstanding still exists when it comes to hiring people with disabilities. In the article, SHRM uncovers that significant biases still exist, with 32% of managers saying they would be uncomfortable hiring someone with a mental-health disability, and 42% of HR professionals believing work can’t be done by someone with a learning or attention disability. Perhaps most striking is a lack of disability training and corporate recruitment initiatives for people with disabilities that are in place.

We’ve hired a lot of people with disabilities over the last 25 years. Over 80% of our current staff have a qualifying disability (and many of those are non-observable disabilities). Below, we share our insights into successfully hiring and retaining individuals with disabilities:

People with Disabilities are Everywhere

Disability crosses all races, cultures, sexes, and identities—it affects people of all walks of life. Disability takes many forms; these include physical, mental, and emotional conditions. Conditions such as ADHD, dyslexia, PTSD, depression, diabetes, and epilepsy are examples of disabilities that are not usually observable but have an impact on life and work and are qualifying conditions under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Additionally, chronic medical conditions (such as having or previously having had cancer) and perceived disabilities (such as dwarfism or physical disfigurements) also qualify. It is estimated that under these definitions, 20% of the US workforce has a disability. You may already be working with someone who has a disability, or you may have a qualifying condition yourself.

People with Disabilities are Still People

People with disabilities are all around us. Often, they want to be treated the same as any other employee. The majority of employees with disabilities do not seek special considerations; they want to be evaluated based on the merits of their work. Many people with disabilities are fully independent adults who strive to have happy, productive working lives. Having a disability will often have little or no bearing on their ability to do a job.

Accommodations Often Aren’t That Bad

The current laws call for “reasonable accommodations” and seek to develop a dialogue between the employee and employer. Accommodations are often not as costly or difficult as an employer might perceive, and also do not require you to fundamentally treat an employee with a disability differently than others. In our experience, most of our employees with disabilities don’t even require an accommodation in order to get their work done.

When they are requested, many accommodations are slight alterations to the work space to ensure that employees will be comfortable, productive, and healthy. For an employee with photosensitivity epilepsy, we often accommodate them by permitting them to wear sunglasses indoors or provide them with a light filter for their computer screen. For an employee with scoliosis, we provide them with a standing desk. The most common situation we encounter is when an employee needs to take time off or modify their work schedule in order to attend doctor appointments. (Individuals without disabilities also go to the doctor!) When an accommodation request does not seem reasonable or compatible with the essential functions of the job, you may want to consult with a seasoned HR professional or legal team for guidance. We also have links to more resources below.

We also encourage employers to consider the possibility that making your workplace more accessible (particularly for those with mobility-related disabilities) may prove to be an investment that enhances the way your entire workforce uses the space. Similarly, making your digital workspace more accessible and comfortable to use, may help many of your existing employees be more productive in their current role. 

It all starts with a conversation.

They Know What They Need

HR managers usually don’t need to figure out how to accommodate an individual—the employee has often encountered this situation before and has an idea of a possible solution. After all, they’ve been living with their condition! They understand their physical conditions and limitations better than anyone else, and they are more likely to seek out jobs where they feel they can be successful. A person who is deaf is less likely to seek out a position that requires a heavy use of phones and other verbal interactions with customers. A person with multiple sclerosis is probably not targeting construction jobs in their job search. As an employer, the best thing you can do is be available to have a conversation and seriously consider the accommodations they suggest. Additionally, consider that at this time they may not be needing an accommodation, but they may need to explore accommodations later if their condition worsens.

What About Current Employees? 

Unfortunately, injuries and illnesses happen over time—it’s part of being human. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the percentage of people with a disability rises dramatically for those past the age of 64.

Disability inclusion in the workplace presents an enormous opportunity to do what’s right, to take care of your own, and improve organizational morale by alleviating fear of displacement through injury or aging. When a current employee approaches you to discuss disability, turn to a trusted HR resource or even the Americans with Disabilities Act itself to understand how to proceed. In general, seek to engage the employee in a conversation and have them recommend an accommodation if one is necessary. Here are a couple of things to keep in mind:

·      Their first choice is probably to stay in their current role. Approach the situation with the intention of making this possible. Discuss their limitations and what they would have trouble doing, or what is currently causing them discomfort in their role. Can this be accomplished by a minor alteration to the work environment or schedule? This may also be accomplished through minor “role restructuring” where you delegate non-essential tasks to other employees (such as lifting boxes in an office environment).  

·      Consider lateral moves. In the instance of someone not being able to perform the essential functions of the job, opportunities for continued employment may exist in other departments and/or under different job titles. If a lateral position is not open or the individual is unqualified to perform that work, then you may also offer another position for which they are qualified but pays less than their current role—but this should be your last resort.

·      Do not discuss with others. Co-workers may notice and ask about it. It’s imperative that you do not discuss disability or medical information that was shared in confidentiality. Many workers with disabilities do not want to be regarded differently in the workplace.  However, it’s also important to stress that you are not offering preferential treatment to that employee. The Job Seekers Accommodation Network recommends saying, when asked, “[your organization] has a policy of assisting any employee who encounters difficulties in the workplace, and that many of the workplace issues encountered by employees are personal, and that, in these circumstances, it is the employer’s policy to respect employee privacy.”

I’m on board! What now?

What Do I Do Now?

So what can your organization do to be ready?

1)    Look at your work. Review your jobs and the type of work that is performed. What kinds of physical requirements might affect someone’s ability to succeed in the role? For example, does it require lifting or strenuous movement? Does it require speaking verbally or seeing?

2)    Look at your workforce. Have a conversation with your team about what a disability is and the value of a diverse and inclusive workplace. Talk about the kinds of disabilities that are both observable and non-observable. Your team knows their work environment and may offer ideas on how the work or space might be presenting a challenge for individuals with disabilities.

3)    Have policies. Many problems arise because of inexperienced managers or HR teams who have to handle a complicated situation without having any policies or training to guide them. Have policies written down and train your on-site managers ahead of time. Have conversations about how to appropriately and compassionately respond to these situations. Highlight the importance of keeping the door open to a dialogue between employees and management.

4)    Consider adaptation plans. Would your workforce benefit by having grab bars in the bathroom? Are your computer applications able to interface with JAWS or other screen reading software? Do you have flexible scheduling options for employees who need to frequently go to the doctor or take time off to recover from a flare up?

Disability is everywhere and often requires little-to-no accommodation to the workplace. Furthermore, people with disabilities know themselves best and will often seek out roles that they can be successful in–much like any other jobseeker! There are many benefits to the organization for having a more inclusive workplace, including making some of your current employees more comfortable. Keep these ideas in mind when taking proactive next steps to hire and retain individuals with disabilities.

Additional Reading

  • We encourage you to learn more about what disabilities are and explore examples of qualifying conditions.
  • Jobseeker Accommodation Network is an exhaustive resource for employers and employees to get accommodation advice.
  • They also offer advice to managers for discussing disability.

Picking the Right Recruiting Agency

Staffing agencies are unique in their service offerings, price, and specialties. Peak Performers, for example, offers direct placement, temporary staffing, and other recruiting services to the public sector and select private sector clients. Let’s take a deeper look at some of the primary considerations to look at when considering recruiting firms and how best to shop wisely for these services.

What Do You Need?

It’s important first and foremost to identify what kind of service you need and what services you’d be open to. Most recruiting services break down into: temporary staffing and direct hire.

Temporary staffing is when the agency recruits and fills a role on a temporary basis. This could be due to a particular high-demand project or filling in for another employee while they are away. Although the temporary employee reports to work at the client company, these individuals are employees of the staffing firm, not the client. The client guides the daily work assignments and coordinates with the staffing firm for employee-related issues. The staffing agency manages the candidate’s performance in conjunction with feedback provided by the client’s on-site manager.

Direct hire is where you outsource the recruiting efforts to find someone for your internal position. From day one, the recruited candidate will start as your employee. Once your company has hired the new employee, the recruiting agency will have no further responsibilities (although good ones will offer placement guarantees and follow up on their placements).

While this explains most models, other models exist as well:

Temp-to-perm is when you want to bring on a temporary employee for a trial period with the intention of converting them to an internal employee if they perform well on the job. You will want to discuss with your staffing agency how long that trial period is and what kinds of fees (if any) will be charged when they are converted. You will likely negotiate the compensation package directly with your potential new employee during the conversion process.

Executive search is largely the same as direct hire except that it is typically reserved for executive, director, and C-level positions. The recruitment firm has a strong network that they can leverage to identify executive-level candidates, who are often already employed (perhaps even outside of your geographic area) and need to be sold on why they want to leave their current job. Typically, the client pays a higher markup percentage than they do for direct hire services and the recruiting firm takes a very “hands on” approach with candidate management to ensure a successful placement.

Pipeline augmentation is when you partner with a staffing firm simply to send you pre-screened resumes. This can be a good approach if you don’t have the resources to spend on recruiters, advertising, and candidate management but you want to do all your own screening and interviewing. Modern recruiting is expensive: for example, subscriptions to popular job board sites, such as Zip Recruiter and Indeed often cost hundreds or thousands of dollars per month, more if you want to promote your job. Pipeline-augmentation approach is also ideal for extremely hard-to-find positions where you need to draw from a wider talent pool.

Costs and Fees

Staff represent the largest expense for nearly every business. Bad hires are a thorn in the side of every HR team as they represent a tremendous amount of lost resources and a possible future liability. For public sector employers, it can take months of progressive disciplinary action and diligent documentation to terminate an employee. On top of all that, HR has no guarantee that the next hire will be any better. Removing temporary employees, by comparison, is relatively easy.

When considering the costs a recruiting firm is charging you, consider that they are absorbing many of the costs and risks associated with recruiting for you. For temporary placements, the staffing firm is also absorbing multiple ongoing employment costs as well.

Temporary staffing charges you a bill rate based off of the hourly wages paid to the temporary worker plus a markup fee. This fee accounts for the cost of staff time; advertising your job to attract candidates; software costs and payroll processing fees; employment taxes; benefits paid to the employee, and general expenses that help to “keep the lights on.” They are also paying for and assuming the risks of possible future workers compensation claims, unemployment claims, and labor disputes, such as discrimination or wrongful termination claims.

Conversion costs? When selecting your temporary staffing vendor, ask about costs to convert temporary workers to full time employees if you decide to hire them on permanently. Conversion costs are typically waived after a period of time, typically around 90-120 days. When applicable, fees typically are a percentage of the candidate’s first year annual salary.

Direct hire/executive search is charged in one of two ways: a percentage of the placed candidate’s annual salary or a flat fee per search. These services are offered in one of three ways:

  • Contingency basis—The agency only gets paid when they make a placement
  • Partially contingent basis— A portion is charged to start the search; another portion is due mid-way through the search; and the remainder is due upon successful hire of a candidate. This model allows you to space out the costs, and the final payment is typically determined by the exact first year salary negotiated with the candidate.
  • Retainer basis— As the client, you pay a monthly or quarterly retainer fee to the recruiting firm. Some very competitive recruiting industries with an extremely restricted pool of candidates may only offer retainer-based searches. A retainer may also be useful for a large client who has ongoing hiring needs. The retainer fee ensures that the staffing agency is continually on the lookout for talent suited for your needs.

Pipeline augmentation is typically a cost for a batch of resumes or per each resume.

What about discounts? Some clients conclude that filling the same role multiple times requires less time, energy, and expense from the recruiting firm. This is simply not the case. Filling three identical positions amounts to about three times the work as filling a single position. Only a marginal amount of time and energy may be saved by not having to build and post multiple job descriptions; however, in order to get a sufficient number of qualified candidates, the staffing firm may actually need to spend more on advertising. The majority of staff time is spent screening and interacting with candidates personally. Volume discounts are sometimes offered not because of the workload but rather the guarantee of future business.

Placement Guarantee? For direct hire and executive search, it’s also important to ask about a placement guarantee. Most companies will stand by their work and the quality of their placements, but it’s important to have this in writing. Placement guarantees are often open to negotiation and range from 30 days to one year (usually depending on the difficulty of filling the job).

Size and structure

Recruiting and staffing firms take many shapes and forms. It’s important to recognize what you’re shopping for in a firm and who you’d most like to do business with.

Local start-up: Many recruiting firms are started specifically to service a specific geographic area. These firms are often located in smaller cities and have civically active owners and operators. Expect more informal dealings and a firm who is uniquely dialed into the local workforce.

Franchises: Large national firms may take a franchise approach. They will be branded as a national chain but be restricted to a particular territory (such as a geographic area or staffing segment). Owners of these franchises will often be enthusiastic small business owners. However, certain aspects of working with them may feel more like working with a large, national firm.

Boutique firm: These firms do direct hire and executive search for a few specific industries from which they’ve previously worked. The recruiters are typically well connected within that industry; they “know people and know the business.” These firms are not typically geographically restricted and you can expect them to be ideal for very specific placements.

Local, mid-sized firm: Peak Performers falls into this category. This type of firm has expanded beyond local start-up and offers a wider variety of services. While they may still have a particular geographic or industry specialization, they have more experience, more customers, more available services, and a deeper candidate pool. Expect from these companies more professional processes, well-trained personnel, and a friendly, local touch.

Large, national firm: These firms have expanded to have many geographic locations nationwide. They will often offer a wide variety of services, have deep candidate pools, and cheaper prices (due to economies of scale). However, there are potential downsides. You will probably never meet your point of contact, as they service you remotely from the company’s headquarters, though occasionally they have regional offices for their account managers. Also, they may not take a deep approach to understanding your business and your needs, since they service so many customers at once. These firms also tend to have higher staff turnover, and you may have a hit-or-miss experience with new account managers. Finally, these firms may be less flexible and adaptable to your needs. In addition to the parameters of their corporate rules, they may have restrictions from previous contracts about what companies they cannot recruit from. They are often contractually obligated to avoid conflicts of interest.

Other Considerations

In addition to all of this, here are some other considerations that help you evaluate whether a recruiting company is truly a quality firm.

What is their communication pattern? A lot can be said about initial correspondence. Is the phone answered? When you leave a message, do they call you back? Are emails professional and prompt? Less reputable staffing firms often cut costs first with their internal staff: having less staff than they need and/or less experienced staff, who themselves are underpaid or rely heavily on commissions. There are a lot of staffing firms out there. Finding one with good communication is key to making sure you’re choosing the right staffing partner.

Industry specialization? A past record of success is the best indicator of future success. For this reason, consider finding a recruiting firm that has experience in your industry. For instance, our specialization at Peak Performers is with the public sector. Many of our clients are state and local government agencies. When you get a firm that specializes in serving an industry, they not only have an existing candidate pool and referral network from which to recruit, but they are also more aware of industry best practices and unique business processes and procedures.

What are their technological abilities? Modern recruiting firms use applicant tracking systems, advertise jobs widely across the internet, and have robust internal processes for ensuring employees are paid on time. Finding a firm with good digital tools reflects an investment on the part of the company toward working efficiently and effectively.

Are they your future recruiting competition? For executive search positions, make sure to ask about the firm’s policy on recruiting candidates away from your organization in the years following your work together. Who is “off limits” and how long does that last? (The industry standard is two years.)

What is their reputation with job seekers? It’s worth taking a moment to read online reviews of the staffing agency you’re about to do business with and approach it as though you were a job seeker. Are they getting bad reviews online? Do they seem to be responsive and empathetic to those negative reviews? Remember that a recruiting firm represents you and your brand among jobseekers. Moreover, the workforce they provide you will become a part of your organization, even if it’s only on a temporary basis.

This should give you a better idea of how to begin your search for a staffing firm. Recruiting and staffing is a complicated, human-focused business. If you ever have questions about whether Peak Performers may be right for your needs, feel free to reach out to us by contacting info@peakperformers.org or calling (512) 453-8833.

So…What Do You Do?

Focus Your Job Search

This article is Part 1 in a three-part series about focusing your job search. Stay tuned for our next installment, coming next month!

Part 1: So…what do you do?

Don’t you hate that question? You get it at parties, you get it at job fairs, you even get it at the dentist! I don’t know about you, but I’m a lot more than just my work. If I’m a job seeker, though, my resume is not the place to tell you who I am.

Employers get hundreds (sometimes thousands) of applications for every position that they post. This creates a mountain of reading that recruiters just cannot do. Often, computers read your resume first and rate it based on how relevant it is to what the recruiter wants. Or, if you’re an overworked recruiter, you read really fast (i.e. 6-10 seconds per resume).

“Who” is a complicated question that gets to the core of our humanity. “What” is a lot easier to communicate. And in recruiting, it’s how we evaluate a candidate for further consideration. In this article, I want to get your resume from “Who” to “What.”

So Many Questions!

One of the hardest parts of the job search is knowing where to start. Full time work provides a location to work, equipment to work on, a community to support and direct you, and, in most cases, clear instructions on what to do on a day-to-day basis.

When you are seeking work, that can all go out the window very quickly. Job searchers must now turn inwards and answer a couple of deep questions.

  • What do I want to do?
  • What can I do?
  • What place (where) do I want to do it?
  • What do I expect from my work?

I have found these questions to be the most basic as well as the most troubling. I ask you to ask yourself, because every day that I’m at a job fair I ask job seekers, “what do you do?”

They say:

Entry-level job seeker: I can do anything!

Experienced job seeker: I can do everything!

Everyone Else: Whatever you want. I just need a job!

I get it…but I can’t help you know yourself. Before ever talking to a recruiter you should have an answer for these questions. We’ll take a deeper dive into each, but first you need to gather a few tools:

  • A copy of your resume you can write on
  • A pen
  • A highlighter

What do I want to do?

For just a minute, I want you to imagine a perfect world where you don’t need to work but instead just want to work. What would you do? I want you to ignore the lightness of your wallet and the anxiety you feel about being around the house all day.

You don’t need to get as granular as defining your job title, but you do need to narrow it down to a few things you want to do. For example, if I wasn’t working at Peak Performers I would enjoy:

  • B2B or technology sales
  • Digital marketing
  • Starting a board game company

But I’m going to make this harder. You now need to answer this question in three words or less. Write them at the top of your resume where it’s so big you can’t ignore or forget what you wrote. Go ahead…I’ll wait.

Here’s what I wrote:

What I want: Business Development / Recruiting

What can I do?

Now, write down a list that ignores your list of what you want to do. This list is for the things you can do whether you want to do them or not. Here’s where I want to you get really specific and list all of the things you can do. Here are some of mine:

  • Email marketing
  • Search engine optimization
  • Pay per click marketing
  • Direct to consumer and retail sales
  • Sourcing government opportunities
  • Writing requests for proposals and/or business proposals
  • Technical recruiting
  • Writing fun content like this!

By the way, this is the most important part to recruiters and companies. Many will train you, but they want you to come in being able to meet the minimum job expectations.

Guess what: now I want you to condense this list down to just three words. Maybe you can do a lot! That’s great, but what are your key skill sets? What would jump out to me as a recruiter? Write these skills down on your resume.

What I can do: Sales / Marketing / Recruiting

What place (where) do I want to do it?

The easy answer to this is “within a X distance drive.” Let’s include this and then go beyond the physical location. You should also consider things like a welcoming environment, a company with a social mission, a younger/older workplace, a progressive/conservative workplace, etc. These are going to be different for each individual. Here’s mine:

  • A company where I can directly help other people
  • A company where I can make the world a better place
  • A company within a 30-minute drive
  • A company that has windows visible from my desk from which I can look out
  • A company that is open with communication and feedback

In. Three. Words. Just three. Write them at the top of that resume!

What place I want: Austin / Positive / Sunshine

What do I expect?

Now we’re getting into the nitty gritty of the job details. Realize that expectations may have to be compromised, but it helps to write them down. Start with the most obvious expectation and the reason most of us go to work each day. Again, here’s my list:

  • I expect to make $XXXX
  • I expect XXXX kind of health insurance
  • I expect XXXX other benefits
  • I expect to have some level of autonomy in my day-to-day work
  • I expect to be valued for my creative contributions
  • I expect to work in a team-oriented environment
  • I expect to maintain a work-life balance

We expect a lot out of our work. As well we should. We spend a lot of time there! But get this down into three words.

What I expect: Autonomy / Compensation / Balance

Congratulations!

I’m sure up to this point you have followed my instructions very, very carefully. I have every confidence that your resume now has 12 words written on top. Right?

Here’s mine:

Business Development /Recruiting
Sales / Marketing / Recruiting
Austin / Positive / Sunshine
Autonomy / Compensation / Balance

This word list gives you a distilled look at what I’m looking for in a job, as well as a list of what I should present on my resume for best results. Now the real work begins.

Edit Your Resume

A common misconception is that resumes should be only one-two pages. A resume should be as long as it needs to be provided that:

  1. It accurately and concisely represents all of you
  2. Is long enough to thoroughly address everything that a job description asks for

We’re going to make a generic resume from which you can start. You will constantly be editing this resume for every single job for which you apply.

  • Highlight: I want you to highlight everything on your resume that points strongly to one of the words that is written above. It can (and usually should) be the word itself.
  • Circle: Anything that may be relevant for a job. Education is a good example; you may well need or should include it on your resume, but often the role you’re applying for does not explicitly require it. Often, these circled items will be listed on your resume but de-emphasized.
  • Cross Out: There’s probably a lot of stuff left on your resume. Cross it out. These are like hoarding shoe boxes or 1980s Christmas decorations or Beanie Babies. Channel your inner Marie Kondo and throw it out.

Respect Your Time

There’s an even more important reason you wrote down those 12 words. You need to make sure that all of your job searches focus on all or most of these words. You should not waste your time with “maybes.” In recruiting, when we look at your resume and think, “hmmm maybe,” that means no. That means we’ll put it off to the side and then forget about it because we’ll eventually find the resumes to which we say, “Yes, yes, YES!”

Getting to Who

You remember Who? Who remembers you and misses you dearly. It’s not that recruiters and HR managers don’t care about Who…it’s just that resumes are not the appropriate place for it. “What” is clear and objective. It’s also what catches our attention in a stack of resumes.

The interview is where you get a chance to show off your “Who.” I could tell you that I love to bike ride, I’ve traveled all over the world, I design board games, and I love to swing dance. You’ll get to know me as a funny, social guy who loves puns. Get to the interview by first answering “What.” If you answer correctly, the interviewers will love the “Who.”

Applicant Tracking Systems

Be One with the Bots

Modern-day recruiters are flooded with resumes from candidates applying for their jobs.  Additionally, recruiters have access to countless resumes online through places like Monster and Indeed.  For this reason, similar to how you use Google to find what you’re looking for online, HR departments are relying on Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) to find the candidates they are looking for (using keyword searches, mostly) and to “save” promising candidates for future opportunities.

In this article, let’s take a deeper dive into the world of recruiting and the tools that they use (Applicant Tracking Systems).

Inside the World of Recruiting

Here at Peak Performers, we take the time to review every single resume that is submitted to us, even though we get over 800 job applies each week. However, many larger organizations get an even higher volume of resumes and have fewer recruiters to sift through them.  Additionally, large companies or public sector departments often have tight deadlines and must rely on their recruiters to find the best candidates very quickly.  It is estimated by themuse.com that recruiters for larger organizations spend less than 6 seconds on each resume.

Imagine for a second that you are asked to find the best qualified candidate and you have a hundred resumes to review. How would you go about this herculean task?

First, we start by using keywords from the job description and matching those to what’s found in the resume–very similar to how you might find something on Google.  The results are returned to us as a “relevancy score.” Basically this means that the computer is trying to figure out how relevant a candidate is to the job we’re trying to fill.  Many recruiters might only look at the first few results (the ones on the top of the page).

Relevancy Score Picture

Ultimately, recruiters are there in order to go through the resumes and then recommend a few of the most promising candidates to their hiring managers or staffing consultants. The recruiter may not make a hiring decision but is influential in choosing who gets invited to interview.

Before you Apply!

Make sure you meet all the minimum qualifications and most of the preferred qualifications.  Submitting a resume is now easier than ever before! Have you ever tried Indeed’s One Button Apply?

But with ease of apply comes many, many irrelevant resumes or under-qualified resumes. Remember that the recruiter and the Applicant Tracking System are not trying to trick you or make it harder for you to get an interview, they’re there to help the promising resumes get noticed. Before you click apply, ask yourself:

A) do I actually want to do a job like this?

B) do I have the experience, education, and skills that is expressed in the job description?

Additionally, preferred qualifications are, as the name suggests, strongly preferred.  Are you a business analyst who has 5 years of experience? Great. The job description might prefer a background working for public sector entities and/or experience with purchasing and procurement–do you have that? If not, the recruiter may still look at your resume, but it’s very possible that they’ll find someone else who does have the preferred qualifications.

This is not meant to discourage you. By all means you should shoot for the stars; however, if you don’t possess the minimum qualifications you may well be wasting both your time and the recruiter’s.  And, believe me, as a recruiter the least favorite part of my job is sending rejection letters.

Resume Optimization in 5 Steps

highlight resume

Now that you know why it matters, I’m going to tell you how to prepare your resume in 5 steps to make you stand out.

  1. Print the job description – what I recommend to job seekers is to print the job description and read it aloud. Next, ask yourself what the recruiter is looking for and how will they find it when they have a lot of resumes to go through. Now, take a highlighter and highlight those words and phrases.  Recruiters are generally asked to find candidates based off of hard skills (tangible skills such as experience with a particular software or a unique named skill set, such as accounting) and soft skills (things like being team-oriented or being organized).
  2. Insert keywords into your resume (multiple times) – Now take those keywords and put them in your resume if they are not there already.  I recommend finding multiple places to insert them.  Typically, I find it helpful to put them in a breakaway skills section under the objective summary and build them into each work experience where you used them. Including keywords multiple times will help increase your “relevancy score” according to the computer, and it is also what the recruiter will first scan for. But remember, your goal is to optimize and present your experience as favorably as possible–not to trick the recruiter by misrepresenting your experience or stuffing your resume with keywords.
  3. Update your objective summary – Many recruiters skip right past this bit on the first read through.  That’s because it often boils down to under-qualified job seekers trying to talk their way into a job or job seekers saying everything that they say in their resume again…except in paragraphs as opposed to bullets. Use the objective summary to specifically call out this job that you’re applying for and make it a true summary of why you are the best qualified candidate for this role.  Additionally, use this section to address any concerns that a recruiter may have that might get you screened out without your providing further explanation: for example, returning to the workforce after a long work hiatus or applying for a job from a different state (here at Peak we work predominately with local candidates or those who have already moved to the area).
  4. Move pieces of your resume around – In my jobs, our clients are typically more focused on direct experience as opposed to education.  When a candidate sees that there is no education requirement and yet puts their education front and center, it simply slows down my eyeballs from getting to the part of their resume that’s relevant to the job.  Again, put yourself in the shoes of a recruiter and think what is important and then figure out how to put it on the first page or as close to it as possible.  Also, relevancy score is often affected by how close the desired keywords appear to the top of the page.
  5. Remove/minimize extra content – Many, many job seekers have a notion that they have to have a resume that is one or two pages long.  (I work primarily in within the public sector within Information Technology staffing and resumes for positions we fill tend to be much longer than this.)  However, I think where this conventional wisdom comes from is recruiters who are used to sifting through hundreds or thousands of resumes for a particular job. This means (theoretically) that the recruiter has to read less content in order to get the gist of a candidate. Having a resume that’s short and sweet is great…if it gets to the recruiter at all. More important is making sure that the resume is specifically targeted to the job using keywords, includes an appropriate objective summary, and is arranged in an order that is relevant. Where you can cut or minimize content is by removing all that extra stuff the job doesn’t call for.  Are you applying for a java developer role but you spent the last 6 months in retail while you went back to school? I don’t need to know about your time working retail except to know what you’ve been doing for the last six months and why you were doing it.

Side note: while it can be nice to put in hobbies or passions at the bottom of your resume (in order to make you feel more personable or start a conversation during the interview), remember that the main thing you’re trying to do is get that interview.

This Sounds Like a Lot of Work

It is. If you follow my recommendations, you will be making a trade off of quality over quantity.  However, you only need one employer to say ‘yes.’  If you take the time to find the right job…one you’re qualified for and one that you want to do…then it’s critical to make yourself look as good as possible.  Sometimes, that resume will still go into an HR black hole and you’ll never hear back; however, it’s also possible that the recruiter took notice but there were other candidates who are even more qualified. Who knows, maybe they’ll seek you out for another similar role?

If you follow my recommendations, you will be making a trade off of quality over quantity.

Bonus Points: Get Recruiters to Find You

Many jobs are not actually posted online because HR departments don’t want to have to sift through tons of resumes.  Additionally, recruiters are often tasked with “pipelining” candidates for prospective jobs, which means we go out and find people with the kinds of skills and experience relevant to the jobs we are typically asked to fill.

Wouldn’t it be nice for recruiters to find you and reach out to you before a job is even posted?

Here’s the catch: you’re not sure what a recruiter somewhere is looking for.  However, you do know what kind of job you want and what kinds of roles you’d be good in.

Go through this exercise again and imagine you’re applying for your ideal job and then post that resume on Monster and Indeed.  I bet you’ll be surprised with the results.

 

Dude, where’s my job? Job seeking advice for recent grads!

Taking the next big leap: into the work world

So you’ve graduated—now what?  Maybe you’ve moved out on your own or maybe you’re looking to.  Maybe you’ve already got your foot in the door with an organization, or maybe you’re bussing tables to make ends meet.

Fear not—employers are looking for energetic and enthusiastic young people like you who are ready to change the world! And there are tons or opportunities out there for the eager recent grad.  

Here are 5 tips to help you get started:

  1. Start somewhere: it may not be your dream job right away, but it helps get you there.  Every job you get from making hamburgers to answering phones teaches you something about yourself and about your talents.  Don’t be afraid to try something new and make professional contacts along the way! (PS: Peak is a great place to start in entry-level professional positions.)
  2. Be flexible: chances are you’re young and mobile.  Take advantage of that. Your first or second job may be located on the other side of the country or maybe even in a different one—sounds like a fantastic adventure! Besides asking yourself when can you start…maybe ask yourself where you can start?
  3. More jobs offline:  You may spend most of your time online but your future employer may not.  Have you thoroughly researched a company before applying there? Have you looked for personal referrals and people who might know people?  Have you networked with anyone besides through Linkedin?
  4. Always follow up: even if you don’t end up taking a job after an interview, give the hiring manager the courtesy of a personal phone call or email to thank  them following an interview or offer. Be grateful for every opportunity whether it lands a job or not.  Always be positive, and leave the door open for future opportunities.
  5. Avoid job hopping: even if you don’t like your job, try to resist the urge to “job hop.”  A prospective employer may be less likely to consider you for a new position if they perceive that you are less committed and dedicated for the long-term.
  6. Pick yourself back up: it’s possible you will fall flat on your face or find yourself in a job that’s a terrible fit for your skillset.  Take note, learn from the experience, and move on. Your first job will likely not be your last—but you’re sure to learn a lot along the way!

Did you know we’re always hiring at Peak?  Have you read about what we do?  Start your career with Peak Performers by sending us your resume.

Best Job Hunting Websites in Austin

One Recruiter’s Opinion: Best Job Hunting Websites for Austin Texas

By Myles Wallace, Technical Recruiter for Peak Performers

There are a lot of job hunting websites out there.  We often get asked which are the best ones to use? Short answer: all of them.  It is so easy to get your resume multiple places that you might as well.  The bigger task then becomes managing all those resumes and the correspondence you may receive from recruiters.  

That said, here’s one recruiter’s take on the top job search websites for job seekers to get noticed in Austin, TX.  

#1 Monster – A long time industry standard, Monster continues to be on every recruiter’s bookmark bar.  This is often the first place I look given the robust search tools available and often a place that many professional job seekers will automatically put their resumes.  Monster allows you to upload your resume as a pdf, Word document, or from a Dropbox or Google Drive file. Monster will also help you create a job searching profile right on their website.  Monster is often compared with Indeed or Careerbuilder and is just one of those job hunting websites you will probably end up using.

#2 Work in Texas – WorkInTexas.com may not be the most user-friendly interface but you will often be required to create a profile if you’re filing for unemployment benefits in Texas.  Don’t think this tool can’t be valuable, though. Your career advisors will use it to help match you up with potential jobs, and recruiters like me peruse it regularly for candidates that have recently joined the job market and may not be visible on other platforms yet.  Also, since many job seekers do not fill out complete profiles, WorkInTexas.com provides a unique opportunity to stand out from the crowd.

#3 LinkedIn – Increasingly, LinkedIn is being used by recruiters to search for living, breathing resumes.  In the recruiting community, some rely on it so strongly that they’re advocating the discontinuation of the resume (I don’t think we’re there yet.)  Nevertheless, if you know someone — or know someone who knows someone — LinkedIn can be a valuable tool. You can draw extra attention to your resume when you connect with a contact and/or send them a personal message through the LinkedIn platform. A LinkedIn profile can direct the viewer to specific credentials and expertise, and often the most regular users of the site are those who are currently employed but entertaining other options.

#4 Glassdoor – Glassdoor wins points for most insights into companies — but, you can find jobs on it too!  Employees past and present are encouraged to post anonymously about their employment experience: including wages, other benefits, work environment, and their personal experience.  As with all online review platforms (*cough* Yelp *cough*), the voices of those who had a bad experience can often drown out the silent majority who had a good or fine experience, but Glassdoor does seek to mitigate this by collecting as many reviews as possible.  Still, take what you read with a grain of salt and use Glassdoor to get an idea of what you’re walking into with a company.

#5 Indeed – Personally, I’m not the biggest fan of Indeed in terms of their pricing structure and the way their resumes often appear to recruiters.  That said, there are a lot of other platforms recruiters use that tie into it. Many Applicant Tracking Systems can already search Indeed and many other commonly used recruiting tools like Ziprecruiter or Mightyrecruiter access it’s immense database effortlessly.  Indeed boasts 200 million unique visitors every month and is used in over 60 countries. In this recruiter’s book: Monster wins quality, Indeed wins quantity.

#6 Google – Known for disrupting marketplaces and aggregating hoards of data, Google recently rolled out an updated job search platform that seeks to solve the problem of the same job being posted multiple places.  Does it work? Sometimes…kinda sorta. What you may not realize is that you’re already using it in your normal searches in that it aggregates data from multiple other job search sites to help cut out a few steps for the job seeker.

This is just one recruiter’s opinion, but hopefully it helps those who are looking for a job. The good news is that there are many valuable tools out there to help you find a job!

Peak Performers Employee Appreciation Event:  PEAKnic

PEAKnic 2018

On Thursday  May 17th, 2018, Peak Performers celebrated their employee appreciation event, PEAKnic.  Aside from the wordplay—there was much horseplay and balloons and painted faces and sidewalk chalk and sandwiches.  What a party!

The Peak staff ready for the big event.  Where are their party hats?

Yeah, those party hats!

Charlie gets into the action announcing winners of a drawing.

Associates Jesse and Marilyn at the event.  Look at all those sandwiches in the background.  Will there be leftovers 😉

Staffing consultant, Cheryl, is sad to see our guests go.  Next year, Cheryl!

A full house and fantastic event.  Thanks to all who could come!

Over 50? Looking for a job?

5 Tips for Job Seekers over 50

It’s hard finding a new job or transitioning careers, especially when you might be thinking more about retirement.  Things can be extra challenging these days competing with tech savvy millennials who will work for lower wages and can relocate easily—however your future is still bright!

Here are 5 tips to compete in the job market!  (By the way, we’re always hiring at Peak!)

  1. Stay positive, stay current: Employers can sense energy and enthusiasm—they appreciate perspective but don’t want someone stuck in the past.  Make sure to stay positive and in the present both on paper and in person.  Remember that you want to highlight your past and not live in it.
  2. Get techie: Realistically, most of your work will be done on a computer from now on.  Most likely you already use a computer on a daily basis but maybe it’s time to learn some new skills.  It’s likely in your new job you will be using Google Docs, Quickbooks, Salesforce, or another cloud-based, collaborative application–so maybe it’s time to do some research and familiarize yourself with the software currently prevalent in your career field.
  3. Update your resume: Have you been in one job for ten years?  Twenty?  Probably time to update your resume.  Did you know that your local library may have resume writing classes?  Have you looked at resume writing tips online?  Also, don’t forget to tailor your resume towards each job you apply for.
  4. Link up—Linkedin: Linkedin is not only a great way to look for jobs but also to reconnect with former colleagues and friends in the field.  Many of your best job leads will come from personal referrals.  So tighten up that resume and get online to connect.
  5. Leverage your experience: you’ve been there and done that.  Don’t forget to show it on your resume and talk about it in the interview.  Most employers value experience, perspective, and a long list of things you’ve done.  While ideal resumes should be tailored specifically to the job you’re looking to get, don’t be afraid to point out all the ways you’ve changed the world!

By the way, have you heard about our mission at Peak?  Do you think you might be a Peak Performer?  Send us your resume!