Now Hiring in Austin – Hot Jobs August 16, 2021

Austin Growing Rapidly: More Jobs Heading to ATX!

This just in: Austin is growing really, really fast. In fact, according to the recent census data, we have seen 21.7% growth in the last decade. As a large MSA, Austin was second in Texas only to Fort Worth which grew 24%. Similarly, we saw surrounding bedroom communities such as Round Rock, Pflugerville, and Georgetown grow rapidly.
With this growth will come more people needing jobs. If you know someone who just moved here, be a friend and send them to Peak Performers. (Also, send them our guide to Austin Job Seeking Resources.) We’re happy to consider them for one of our many open jobs, and they’ll get a chance to expand their professional network in Austin. Right now we’re recruiting for everything from Auditors to Enterprise Data Architects.
*A complete list of our open jobs found at https://www.peakperformers.org/jobseeker/office-jobs/
This is a chart showing Austin's growth according to the census
Austin grew 21.7% in the last decade. Chart showing Austin’s growth

Now Hiring in Austin: August 16, 2021

Grant Accountant Job! Do you have experience with Texas Grants Management Standards and 3 years of experience working in accounting operations? If so, we’re looking for a Grant Accountant. Pay is $27 / hour. https://www.peakperformers.org/jobseeker/office-jobs?rpid=p92E4Wjozr4 

Auditor Jobs! Are you an Auditor? Do you want to work in compliance, investigations, or records review? We are filling multiple positions with multiple agencies. Pay ranges from $20 – $28 DOE. https://www.peakperformers.org/jobseeker/office-jobs/ 

Grant Coordinator Job! Do you have experience working for a state agency? Do you want to help grant administration, monitoring, and preparing of education material? If so we’re looking for a Post Secondary Education Grant Coordinator. Pay is $29 / hour. https://www.peakperformers.org/jobseeker/office-jobs?rpid=qxikIpMlKmw 

Enterprise Architect Job! Do you have experience working for state agencies and a passion for data modeling, collection, and storage. We’re now recruiting for an Enterprise Data Architect role. Pay is $69 / hour. https://www.peakperformers.org/jobseeker/office-jobs?rpid=s4mfD1bhMbE 

Purchaser Jobs! Are you a state certified Purchaser? Are you looking to work for the state of Texas? We now have multiple roles and levels open for experienced purchasers. Pay is $22 – $28 DOE. https://www.peakperformers.org/jobseeker/office-jobs?rpid=MxLgDE0si50 

Many more jobs can be found at 
https://www.peakperformers.org/jobseeker/office-jobs/

Cover letters for Austin jobs

How Important are Cover Letters?

The utility of the cover letter will vary between jobs and between job seekers in Austin. While somewhat old fashioned, cover letters are a nice way of introducing yourself and expressing your interest in the job.

At the very least, they can’t hurt.

Cover Letter Comic
Cover letters aren’t always read, but when they are they can have an impact. Comic from amazingsuperpowers.com

Cover Letter Tips

Don’t rely on the cover letter to tell your story. A cover letter may or may not get read. So make sure that it’s supplemental to your resume and a “nice, personalized touch” that will help you stand out between multiple qualified candidates. In addition to a cover letter, I recommend putting in a brief statement at the top of your resume about what kind of role you’re seeking and a summary of your qualifications.

Cover letters can be helpful if you’re not the obvious choice candidate. If you are attempting to switch careers or get back into the job market after an employment gap, cover letters can help you overcome objections or add more context and explanation to your candidacy.

Make sure to customize your cover letter. Too often, when I do see cover letters, they are very obviously copy-pasted from a template. Job seekers won’t bother to customize the thing that’s supposed to be a personal touch! If you’re using “Dear Sir or Madam,” you probably haven’t done enough networking and research into the organization for the cover letter to be truly impactful.

Emphasize your network connection/referral. As a follow up to the previous point, if you have a personal connection into an organization, a cover letter is a great way take advantage of this network. You can name drop your connection, and it increases the odds that your application will get seen and will spark a conversation about you.

Watch for typos on your cover letter. You want a cover letter to be the best representation of yourself. Since it’s a bit of a formal document anyway, if you can’t make it typo-free and grammatically sound, I’d skip it as it may jeopardize your candidacy. Attention to detail is important.

Cover letters are a great follow up. What I also see is a cover letter used as a follow up after you apply. I think it can have a good value used this way!

Cover Letter Templates

It’s still good to have a template even if you don’t think you’ll need to use a cover letter often. All job seekers should have a cover letter template they can customize and send at a moment’s notice. Some employers still require it as part of the application process. Indeed has an amazing  library of sample cover letters. You can also check out this previous article on Peak’s site with tips for writing a good cover letter.

Now Hiring in Austin – Hot Jobs August 10, 2021

Austin Job Market Growing Fast

Austin has almost regained all jobs lost prior to the pandemic as our area continues to see rapid hiring. However, there are A LOT of people still out of work, including: people who took time off to care for dependents, retail and service workers who saw their jobs permanently disappear, and people with disabilities.  People with disabilities are often the first to be let go and last to be re-hired in organizations

Many with disabilities were laid off or voluntarily dropped out due to health concerns, and they can use your help finding their next job!

So who do you know who’s looking for work? Who do you know who has been out of a job for a while and is tentative about getting back to work? Peak Performers can help these professionals find their next job—let’s put people to work!

*A complete list of our open jobs found at https://www.peakperformers.org/jobseeker/office-jobs/

**More information on the Austin Job market can be found on the Austin Chamber of Commerce Blog

Chart Showing Austin Job Growth
Austin has re-gained 96% of jobs lost from the pandemic

Now Hiring! Our Hot Jobs August 10, 2021

NEW JOB! Do you have experience working for a state agency? Do you want to help grant administration, monitoring, and preparing of education material? If so we’re looking for a Grant Coordinator. Pay is $29 / hour. https://www.peakperformers.org/jobseeker/office-jobs?rpid=qxikIpMlKmw 

REMOTE ROLE! Do you pride yourself in examining, investigating, and reviewing financial statements? Do you have a certification as an auditor (CGAP, CFE, CIA, or CPA)? If so, we are now hiring for a remote Auditor IV (Austin-based) pay is $28 / hour.  https://www.peakperformers.org/jobseeker/office-jobs?rpid=_pj35EoBe3M 

IT JOB! Do you have experience working for state agencies and a passion for data modeling, collection, and storage. We’re now recruiting for an Enterprise Data Architect role. Pay is $69 / hour. https://www.peakperformers.org/jobseeker/office-jobs?rpid=s4mfD1bhMbE 

MULTIPLE OPENINGS! Are you a state certified Purchaser? Are you looking to work for the state of Texas? We now have multiple roles and levels open for experienced purchasers. Pay is $22 – $28 DOE. https://www.peakperformers.org/jobseeker/office-jobs?rpid=MxLgDE0si50 

Many more jobs can be found at 
https://www.peakperformers.org/jobseeker/office-jobs/

Austin Job Seeker Resources

Peak Performers is an active part of the recruiting and job seeking community and connected to many organizations and resources that may help job seekers find work. Here is our curated list of Austin job seeking resources:  

General Job Seeker Services

Workforce Solutions is the operational arm of Texas Workforce Commission in providing various job seeker services. Peak Performers does not provide job seeker services and will usually refer job seekers onto Workforce Solutions.

You can turn to Workforce Solutions for services such as:

  • Unemployment benefits
  • Free or discounted training and education opportunities
  • Workplace accommodation resources
  • Childcare assistance services
  • Resume and interview coaching 
  • Career coaching

http://www.wfscapitalarea.com/Job-Seekers

NEW! In response to the sudden rise in unemployment, Workforce Solutions has launched a “Jobs Now” website, which is a manually curated list of jobs that are still hiring despite current market conditions.

Additionally, they hold job fairs periodically throughout the year:

  • Bi-weekly general job fairs
  • Industry-specific job fairs
  • Public sector job fairs
  • Disability-focused job fairs
  • Second chance job fairs
  • Veterans job fairs

http://www.wfscapitalarea.com/CalendarEvents

There are multiple locations in the Austin area, and they’re open 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday. They accept walk-ins and appointments for job seekers with specific needs.

  • 9001 N Interstate Hwy 35 Ste 110, Austin, TX 78753 (North Austin)
  • 575 Round Rock W Dr Building H, Suite 240, Round Rock, TX 78681 (Round Rock)
  • 3401 Webberville Rd #1000, Austin, TX 78702 (East Austin)
  • 7701 Metropolis Dr, Austin, TX 78744 (South Austin)

Austin Job Clubs

Job seeking can be demoralizing, especially if you’re told “no” over and over. It can be valuable to join a community of other job seekers to keep you motivated and to offer guidance along the way. Fortunately, Austin metro area has three prominent job clubs which you can become involved in. They will often feature speakers, job fairs, and resume workshops. These are free to attend—they ask for donations from previous job seekers and from employer sponsorships.

Job Seekers Network – Meetings in Northwest Austin every Monday

HIRED Texas – Meetings in Round Rock every Tuesday

LaunchPad Job Club – Meetings in North Austin every Friday

Note: currently job clubs are suspended due to outbreaks in the COVID-19. This article will be updated when the job clubs are back in session.

Recommended Job Seeker Websites

There are a lot of websites out there to help job seekers find work and much of your time is going to be spent utilizing these resources. Gone are the days of walking into businesses and dropping off your resume at the front desk. “Help wanted” signs now hang in the digital window.

You should use all or many of these websites to aid your job search. Generally, these websites are free to job seekers and require minutes to start an account.

ZipRecruiter – this platform has taken the recruiting world by storm as it does a great job of proactively finding jobs that may be a fit and inviting you to apply. It is also pulls jobs from hundreds of other websites and centralizes them in one place.

Monster – this platform is used by many recruiters for its advanced search features. It also tends to attract many professional and information technology job seekers. From an employer side, the cost is rather daunting but that tends to attract larger employers looking for hard-to-find candidates.

Dice – this is widely used in the Austin information technology job search community. Dice tends to attract mid and senior -level professionals.

WorkInTexas – this is used in Texas by Workforce Solutions to post jobs. Jobseekers filing for unemployment will be required to build a profile….but take time to do it right—many job seekers don’t fill in all the information! Savvy recruiters use this website because it’s free and because it’s a snap shot of nearly all job seekers available, not just the ones who have their resume up on other platforms.

Glassdoor – jobs are posted to Glassdoor but perhaps more important are the tools to read company reviews and explore salaries. Glassdoor is an important part of your research toolkit so that you spend time engaging with reputable companies.

Austin Chamber of Commerce – in response to the COVID-19 unemployment crisis, the Austin Chamber of Commerce has launched a listing of businesses in Austin who are still hiring. Great for doing some research and discovering companies that you haven’t heard of before.

Additional Job Seeking Resources

Here is a list of other resources that I refer people onto who are looking for work:

AustinUp is a local nonprofit that connects older adults (ages 50+) with employers seeking experienced professionals. AustinUp also partners with AARP in order to connect older adults with a host of other services. AustinUp has periodic job fairs throughout the year as well as regular meetings.

Texas Veterans Commission supports Texas veterans and their spouses who are looking for work and other services. Texas Veterans Commission career advisors work out of Workforce Solutions offices.

Austin Community College Employment Readiness Training is a “boot camp” to help job seekers get ready to look for work. Perfect for those who have not looked for work for a little while and are feeling overwhelmed.

Other Community Resources

There can be other barriers getting in the way of finding a job. Here is a list of some of those local resources:

Austin Urban League is a local nonprofit that seeks to help African Americans and other under-served urban residents with job training, housing programs, and education.

Homeless Veteran Assistance the local VA helps homeless veterans get connected to housing and jobs. Local resources available to help veterans and their spouses.

Dress for Success helps disadvantaged women by providing professional attire, a network of support, and career development resources.

Workforce Education and Readiness Continuum is a branch Workforce Solutions here to connect job seekers to specific resources they will need prior to starting work.

Foundation Communities is a local nonprofit that assists central Texas residents with financial assistance, health insurance, and access to other services to help ensure they are able to start work.

So…What Do You Do?

Focus Your Job Search

“So…what do you do?”

Don’t you hate that question? You get it at parties, you get it at job fairs, you even get it at the dentist! I don’t know about you, but I’m a lot more than just my work. If I’m a job seeker, though, my resume is not the place to tell you who I am.

Employers get hundreds (sometimes thousands) of applications for every position that they post. This creates a mountain of reading that recruiters just cannot do. Often, computers read your resume first and rate it based on how relevant it is to what the recruiter wants. Or, if you’re an overworked recruiter, you read really fast (i.e. 6-10 seconds per resume).

“Who” is a complicated question that gets to the core of our humanity. “What” is a lot easier to communicate. In recruiting, it’s how we evaluate a candidate for further consideration. In this article, I want to get your resume from “Who” to “What.”

Questions to Ask Yourself When Looking for a Job

One of the hardest parts of the job search is knowing where to start. Full time work provides a location to work, equipment to work on, a community to support and direct you, and, in most cases, clear instructions on what to do on a day-to-day basis.

When you are seeking work, that can all go out the window very quickly. Job searchers must now turn inwards and answer a couple of deep questions.

  • What do I want to do?
  • What can I do?
  • What place (where) do I want to do it?
  • What do I expect from my work?

I have found these questions to be the most basic as well as the most troubling. I ask you to ask yourself, because every day that I’m at a job fair I ask job seekers, “what do you do?”

We’ll take a deeper dive into each, but first you need to gather a few tools:

  • A copy of your resume you can write on
  • A pen
  • A highlighter

1) What do you want to do?

For just a minute, I want you to imagine a perfect world where you don’t need to work but instead just want to work. What would you do? I want you to ignore the lightness of your wallet and the anxiety you feel about being around the house all day.

But I’m going to make this harder. You now need to answer this question in three words or less. Write them at the top of your resume where it’s so big you can’t ignore or forget what you wrote. 

2) What can you do?

Now, write down a list that ignores your list of what you want to do. This list is for the things you can do whether you want to do them or not. Here’s where I want to you get really specific and list all of the things you can do.

This is the most important part to recruiters and companies. Many will train you, but they want you to come in being able to meet the minimum job expectations.

Now I want you to condense this list down to just three words. Maybe you can do a lot! That’s great, but what are your key skill sets? What would jump out to me as a recruiter? Write these skills down on your resume.

3) What place (where) do I want to do it?

The easy answer to this is “within a X distance drive.” Let’s include this and then go beyond the physical location. You should also consider things like a welcoming environment, a company with a social mission, a younger/older workplace, a progressive/conservative workplace, etc. These are going to be different for each individual.

4) What do you expect?

Now we’re getting into the nitty gritty of the job details. Realize that expectations may have to be compromised, but it helps to write them down. Start with the most obvious expectation and the reason most of us go to work each day. Here are some things you might expect

  • I expect to make $XXXX
  • I expect XXXX kind of health insurance
  • I expect XXXX other benefits
  • I expect to have some level of autonomy in my day-to-day work
  • I expect to be valued for my creative contributions
  • I expect to work in a team-oriented environment
  • I expect to maintain a work-life balance

We expect a lot out of our work. As well we should. We spend a lot of time there! But get this down into three words.

Edit Your Resume

A common misconception is that resumes should be only one-two pages. A resume should be as long as it needs to be provided that:

  1. It accurately and concisely represents all of you
  2. Is long enough to thoroughly address everything that a job description asks for

We’re going to make a generic resume from which you can start. You will constantly be editing this resume for every single job for which you apply.

  • Highlight: I want you to highlight everything on your resume that points strongly to one of the words that is written above. It can (and usually should) be the word itself.
  • Circle: Anything that may be relevant for a job. Education is a good example; you may well need or should include it on your resume, but often the role you’re applying for does not explicitly require it. Often, these circled items will be listed on your resume but de-emphasized.
  • Cross Out: There’s probably a lot of stuff left on your resume. Cross it out. These are like hoarding shoe boxes or 1980s Christmas decorations or Beanie Babies. Channel your inner Marie Kondo and throw it out.

Want more resume tips? Be sure to check out this article.

Getting to “Who”

It’s not that recruiters and HR managers don’t care about who you are…it’s just that resumes are not the appropriate place for it. “What” is clear and objective. It’s also what catches our attention in a stack of resumes.

Once you get to the interview, show off “who” you are in order to stand out from the other applicants.

Are you looking for work? Check out our open jobs.

Dude, where’s my job? Job seeking advice for recent grads!

Looking for Work for Recent Graduates:

So you’ve graduated—now what?  Maybe you’ve moved out on your own or maybe you’re looking to.  Maybe you’ve already got your foot in the door with an organization, or maybe you’re bussing tables to make ends meet.

Fear not—employers are looking for energetic and enthusiastic young people like you who are ready to change the world! And there are tons or opportunities out there for the eager recent grad.  

5 Tips to Get Started

1) Start somewhere:

It may not be your dream job right away, but it helps get you there.  Every job you get from making hamburgers to answering phones teaches you something about yourself and about your talents.  Don’t be afraid to try something new and make professional contacts along the way! (PS: Peak is a great place to start in entry-level professional positions.)

2) Be flexible:

Chances are you’re young and mobile.  Take advantage of that. Your first or second job may be located on the other side of the country or maybe even in a different one—sounds like a fantastic adventure! Besides asking yourself when can you start…maybe ask yourself where you can start?

3) More jobs offline

You may spend most of your time online but your future employer may not.  Have you thoroughly researched a company before applying there? Have you looked for personal referrals and people who might know people?  Have you networked with anyone besides through Linkedin?

4) Always follow up

Even if you don’t end up taking a job after an interview, give the hiring manager the courtesy of a personal phone call or email to thank  them following an interview or offer. Be grateful for every opportunity whether it lands a job or not.  Always be positive, and leave the door open for future opportunities.

5) Avoid job hopping

Even if you don’t like your job, try to resist the urge to “job hop.”  A prospective employer may be less likely to consider you for a new position if they perceive that you are less committed and dedicated for the long-term.

Did you know we’re always hiring at Peak?  Have you read about what we do?  Start your career with Peak Performers by sending us your resume.

Best Job Hunting Websites in Austin

Top Job Hunting Websites for Austin Texas

There are a lot of job hunting websites out there.  We often get asked which are the best ones to use? Short answer: all of them.  It is so easy to get your resume multiple places that you might as well.  The bigger task then becomes managing all those resumes and the correspondence you may receive from recruiters.  

Here’s one recruiter’s take on the top job search websites for job seekers to get noticed in Austin, TX.  

ZipRecruiter

ZipRecruiter has taken the hiring market by storm. They aggregate many millions of resumes and are a great starting point for getting recruiters to call you. Also, since ZipRecruiter “scrapes” resumes from other online platforms, it’s possible your resume already has some visibility on this platform.

Indeed

There are a lot of other platforms recruiters use that tie into it. Many Applicant Tracking Systems can already search Indeed and many other commonly used recruiting tools like Ziprecruiter or Mightyrecruiter access it’s immense database effortlessly.  Indeed boasts 200 million unique visitors every month and is used in over 60 countries.

Google Jobs

Known for disrupting marketplaces and aggregating hoards of data, Google recently rolled out an updated job search platform that seeks to solve the problem of the same job being posted multiple places.  Does it work? Usually. This is a great place for discovering jobs posted on other platforms or directly on company websites.

LinkedIn

Increasingly, LinkedIn is being used by recruiters to search for living, breathing resumes.  In the recruiting community, some rely on it so strongly that they’re advocating the discontinuation of the resume  If you know someone — or know someone who knows someone — LinkedIn can be a valuable networking tool. You can draw extra attention to your resume when you connect with a contact and/or send them a personal message through the LinkedIn platform. A LinkedIn profile can direct the viewer to specific credentials and expertise, and often the most regular users of the site are those who are currently employed but entertaining other options.

Glassdoor

Glassdoor wins points for most insights into companies — but, you can find jobs on it too!  Employees past and present are encouraged to post anonymously about their employment experience: including wages, other benefits, work environment, and their personal experience.  As with all online review platforms (*cough* Yelp *cough*), the voices of those who had a bad experience can often drown out the silent majority who had a good or fine experience, but Glassdoor does seek to mitigate this by collecting as many reviews as possible.  Still, take what you read with a grain of salt and use Glassdoor to get an idea of what you’re walking into with a company.

Work in Texas

WorkInTexas.com may not be the most user-friendly interface but you will often be required to create a profile if you’re filing for unemployment benefits in Texas.  Don’t think this tool can’t be valuable, though. Your career advisors will use it to help match you up with potential jobs, and recruiters like me peruse it regularly for candidates that have recently joined the job market and may not be visible on other platforms yet.  Also, since many job seekers do not fill out complete profiles, WorkInTexas.com provides a unique opportunity to stand out from the crowd.

If you’re looking for work in Texas, don’t forget to send your resume to Peak Performers!

Finding the job you LOVE

Advice from Peak Performers founder and CEO

For many of us, growing up is a time of exploring ideas and our relationship to life – to others around us and the universe in which we live.  It’s a big and complex universe with an enormous number of choices to be made.  Many of us spend the first 25+ plus years of life just figuring out which choices will aid our survival the most (and which ones are most harmful).

Most schools emphasize getting to college as soon as High School is done and that often means entering the full time workforce at the age of 22, 23 or later.  And it can be a big parental (and personal) disappointment when you discover that you actually dislike the kind of work for which you have been trained – at enormous cost.  And if you graduate with debt the shock and disappointment can be personally devastating.

How can you know what you love to do, until you do it?

So finding the job, the work you love, is a bit tricky.  It’s a bit of a chicken and egg problem.  How can you know what you love to do, until you do it?  You may find that even the greatest job at the best company in the world can send you into your pillow crying if your boss is mean.  Or you may find the menial tasks of your chosen profession drive you to a boredom not experienced since Middle school.

The days of going to work for one employer in one city, in one trade or profession are gone.  The odds are very good that you will not work any one place for 30 years.  

Job Sampling

Job sampling, and temporary work, in today’s “gig” economy is the most beneficial way for you to find out:

  • Where you want to work
  • What kind of work you really enjoy
  • How your skills can be best deployed to help an employer
  • How and where you get the most personal job satisfaction.  

Work is no longer just about the paycheck

For the first decade of working, I had no idea what kinds of jobs I loved, so I sampled multiple jobs, employers, and job types.  From highly technical and precise map making, to highly imprecise and social sales jobs. 

Prior to creating Peak Performers, I had jobs in…

  • A car wash, making dirty cars clean (until the next time it rained)
  • Mapping possible hydroelectric dam locations
  • Selling Persian, Turkish and other exotic rugs and expensive carpets
  • Selling electronic stereo equipment and home electronics
  • Mapping the back side of the moon
  • Analyzing the right level of staffing for large plywood manufacturing plants
  • Grinding steel plates in a machine shop (that lasted one day)
  • Selling insurance and annuity products to elderly people
  • Helping people with disabilities develop work skills
  • Helping minority and women owned small businesses get government contracts
  • Helping low income and minority workers get re-trained and placed into new careers
  • Helping older workers get trained to change occupations and helping minority youth access the workforce 

I finally settled on helping people with disabilities develop work skills as my ideal type of work.  That was after having 15 jobs!  Some lasting years and some only months.  

To give another example: our family dentist began his post-university career as an electrical engineer.  He is a highly social person who likes talking to patients.  Electrical engineering was not a good fit, to say the least.

Finding What you Love

No one really knows what they LOVE to do until they have done some various things.

No one really knows what they LOVE to do until they have done some various things.  Employers are no longer expecting you to give them your whole life and they are no longer guaranteeing you a lifetime job.  That’s a good thing for people seeking a well-balanced, happy and prosperous life because you don’t want to commit for the next 30 years either.

So, looking at the reality of today’s job market, all jobs are, in effect, temporary.  And you as a candidate can make the best of this opportunity to look around and sample different jobs, in different sectors for different employers until you find the job you LOVE.  

The whole box of chocolates might look inviting, but there will be one in the box that’s better than all the others.  It’s up to you to find it.

-Charlie Graham, founder and CEO of Peak Performers

Are you looking to try out a career field? Why not consider one of our temporary jobs?

Writing a compelling cover letter

Six seconds. That’s the amount of time recruiters typically spend reviewing an individual resume. That’s the same amount of time you probably spent reading the previous sentence. Or about how long it takes Usain Bolt to sprint across a fifty-meter finish line. That means you’ve got to catch their attention quickly and hope they somehow stay engaged long enough to consider your actual qualifications.

When you’re trudging through the muck of a job search, much of the process can feel painfully automated. Resume. Application. Follow-up. Rinse and repeat.

And then there’s the obnoxious cover letter. It’s typically the hardest part of the process, but it’s also your best opportunity to shine.

Since there’s a high probability recruiters also spend very little time reading your cover letter, we’ve provided some of our best advice and resources to help you capture the heart and soul of the hiring manager.

Start with a template. A good cover letter introduces yourself to the hiring team and clearly explains why you’re the best person for the job. There are numerous templates and examples available, so there is no need to start from scratch. However, it is absolutely essential to customize the text every single time.

Bonus tip: We recommend using a free formatting service like ineedaresu.me to create a visually coordinated and appealing style.

Research the company. This is your chance to show that you understand the company culture and you’re a good fit for the job. Read the website and consume any online literature in order to best reflect the tone, voice and ethos of the company. Use the job description to follow the application instructions and highlight any keywords.

Bonus tip: Consider using a program like jobscan.co to measure how well your text matches with that of the job description.

Tell a captivating story. Simply regurgitating everything you’ve already written on your resume is the best way for your cover letter to end up in the trash. Use the space to create a compelling narrative that highlights the reasons why you’re the best fit. This is your chance to tell the story of your most relevant skill with specific, measurable examples.

Bonus tip: Avoid awkward phrasing and overly formal language that could make you seem rigid and insincere. An honest, genuine writing style goes further than a robotic and formulaic tone.

Promote your skills. Imagine yourself three weeks from now, and you’ve just been offered the job. Consider the cover letter as your acceptance speech to the world. It can feel uncomfortable to toot your own horn, but if there is any appropriate moment to showcase your skills, this is it.

Bonus tip: The cover letter can also be the ideal place to address any gaps in your resume or other extenuating circumstances, such as a recent job change or cross-country move.

Find an introduction. You may not always know someone who works directly for the company, but you might know someone else who does. If not, use LinkedIn or Google to find the hiring manager’s name so it can be included in the salutation. When a person reads their name (or someone they know) in a cover letter, it triggers an inherent, visceral response, and it could help them remember your name as well.

Bonus tip: For more detailed information, check out this comprehensive guide on how to write a cover letter from our friends at the Uptowork blog.

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7 questions to ask in your next job interview

Most job seekers understand the importance of asking good questions during the interview. Not only is it essential to come prepared with answers, but it’s also critical to ask the right questions. Your inquiries communicate a lot about who you are and what your expectations are for the position. By asking genuine and engaging questions, you’re showing the interviewer that you actually care about the position, the company, and how you might be able to contribute.

Think of the questions you ask as being statements that can help set you apart from competing candidates. Asking too soon about salary, for instance, could communicate to the interviewer that you’re primarily concerned with money. Your finances might be an honest concern, but leading with this question could also make you seem greedy or parsimonious. A question about teamwork, however, communicates that you are collaborative and ready to work well with others.

Think of the questions you ask as being statements that can help set you apart from competing candidates.

This past calendar year, our staff interviewed over a thousand candidates. Based on our staffing and recruiting experience in Austin, we’ve compiled some of our best-recommended questions to ask in your next interview:

How long have you worked here? What have you enjoyed most?

Poet and activist Maya Angelou is often attributed with saying, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” The same is true for job interviews. Asking personable questions can give you insights into the office culture and it can also make a lasting impression on the hiring manager.

What is the ideal candidate for this position?

This is a great open-ended question to help clarify any misunderstandings about the role. If the hiring manager says something you have not explicitly mentioned yet, this presents an excellent opportunity to fill in the gaps. This is your chance to tell them that you’re the person they’ve been looking for.

How would you describe the company’s culture?

Cultural fit is becoming more and more of a determining factor in the hiring process. Remember that the interview is also a way for you to determine whether or not you want to pursue the role. This question also provides an indirect way to find out more about overall employee wellness and benefits programs.

How does this company define and measure success?

Not only does this question help you understand the company’s expectations, it also implies that you are focused and determined to be successful.

I read ABC in XYZ about your company. Can you tell me more about that?

Most people know it’s important to research the company prior to your job interview. This question gives you an opportunity to show that you’ve done your homework without coming across as a know-it-all.

Do you have any specific concerns that I can address in further detail?

It might seem counterintuitive to highlight your own flaws in an interview. However, this question conveys a sense of confidence and could provide insight into what the hiring manager(s) might be thinking. It also gives you one last chance to clarify any apprehension regarding your candidacy.

What is the next step in the hiring process?

Consider this question as an opportunity to affirm your desire and enthusiasm for the position. It also might provide some insight into how many other candidates are being interviewed or when you should plan to send your follow-up message.

Keep in mind that these are only examples, and you should customize these questions based on the specifics of the position you’re considering. In general, focus on asking open-ended questions, and practice asking them out loud until you feel confident. Practice. Practice. Practice.

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5 tips to make the most of your next job fair

Job fairs can either be an incredible networking opportunity or an incredible waste of time. Like most aspects of the job search, thorough preparation and strategic follow-up are crucial to success. Here’s how to make the most of your next event:

Come prepared. Once you find out what companies will be present, do some additional research to help prioritize the ones you’d like to target. Don’t waste your time talking to companies that are obviously not a good fit. Check the company websites for specific job postings you find interesting and apply online ahead of time. It’s always important to update and bring printed copies of your resume or any other materials you might need.

Memorize your stump speech. Remember that you’re indirectly competing with everyone else who attends the event. Tell an honest, but unique story, and prepare to say it over and over again. You’ll want to quickly and clearly communicate who you are, what skills you can offer and some specifics regarding your ideal scenario.

Be a professional. Arrive early to ensure that you’re able to meet with each company you’re targeting. We recommend treating each interaction just as you would a traditional job interview. Dress to impress. Be enthusiastic. Stay engaged. Give a firm handshake. Even though job fairs tend to be more casual than interviews, be careful not to overshare information about your health, personal opinions or political affiliations. And try not to be that person who mulls around and takes all the tchotchkes without making eye contact with anyone.

Make your time count. As you interact with recruiters, try to collect as many business cards as possible. Ask good questions, and try to make small connections with people so you can reference it later when you follow up. If you’re standing in line waiting to talk to a representative, study the company literature or listen to the conversations going on in front of you to glean as much information as you can. It’s also important to be nice to everyone, including other job seekers or event staff. You never know what interaction might make (or break) your next opportunity.

Follow up and follow through. Taking copious notes during (or immediately after) the event will help you organize your next steps. You’ll want to remember names, titles, contact information and any additional instructions on how to follow up. It’s also helpful to jot down any personal connections you make with recruiters (i.e. shared hobbies, sports teams, alma maters) so you can be sure to include this in your follow up correspondence. Send a brief email to each person you met. Here’s a very simple template to get you started:

Subject: From [your full name]: Nice to meet you!

Hi [first name of recruiter],

My name is [your name], and we met today at [recruiting event]. I just wanted to thank you again for sharing your experience and for providing information about your open positions.

As discussed earlier, I’m very excited to explore further opportunities with [company name]. I really appreciated your time and helpful advice.

I’ve also attached my resume for reference, and a few of the projects I mentioned as well. Please let me know if there’s anything else you need on my end. I look forward to connecting again soon!

Best,

[Full Name]
[Phone Number]

And don’t forget to join us on Wednesday, February 1st, for our next internal job fair. For more information, check out our event page here.  If you’re interested in keeping an eye on our open positions, you can also subscribe to updates here.