Peak Performers’ Co-CEO, Bree Sarlati, Recognized Globally by Staffing Industry

Austin, TX – Bree Sarlati, Co-CEO of Peak Performers, was recognized by the Staffing Industry Analyst’s annual “40 under 40” list. Founded in 1989, Staffing Industry Analysts (SIA) is the leading global advisor on staffing.

These 40 professionals exemplify passion, integrity, creativity and the perseverance that is needed to connect people to new opportunities amid COVID-19 and beyond,” from SIA’s website.

Bree started with Peak in 2012 and has worked in every part of Peak’s business: payroll, marketing, recruiting, staffing, and office management. Bree joined the leadership team in 2017 and under her leadership, she has lead a series of organizational transformations and grown Peak’s book of business by 40%.

In spite of these troubled times, Peak Performers is a success story: we are a local, medium-sized business that continues to grow and offer much needed jobs to hundreds of people,” Bree commented after the award.

Peak Performers was started in 1994 by Bree’s father, Charlie Graham, who now shares her title as Co-CEO. Peak assists over 60 government agencies and last year employed over 770 people in temporary and temporary-to-permanent positions. Peak Performers employs people in administrative, professional, accounting, and information technology jobs.

Peak has been most recently assisting the Texas Workforce Commission in recruiting for dozens of roles to help with the processing of unemployment claims during the COVID-19 crisis.

Peak Performers is a rare nonprofit staffing firm: there are only a handful of similarly structured organizations in the country. As part of their nonprofit mission, Peak is setting a new standard of employment for people with disabilities and chronic medical conditions by helping them get professional roles. Skilled job seekers with ADA-qualifying conditions receive job priority for Peak’s positions and over 80% of their workforce have an ADA-qualifying condition. Peak’s vision is two-fold: to change what it means to be a job seeker with a disability, and to challenge the preconceptions that make employers reluctant to hire someone with a disability.

Our mission now is especially important. In the best of times, people with disabilities experience an unemployment rate double that of the national average. That’s why we’re committed to helping people succeed through meaningful employment opportunities,” said Bree.

###

Media contact: myles@peakperformers.org – (512) 453-8833 X 116

So…What Do You Do?

Focus Your Job Search

This article is Part 1 in a three-part series about focusing your job search. Stay tuned for our next installment, coming next month!

Part 1: So…what do you do?

Don’t you hate that question? You get it at parties, you get it at job fairs, you even get it at the dentist! I don’t know about you, but I’m a lot more than just my work. If I’m a job seeker, though, my resume is not the place to tell you who I am.

Employers get hundreds (sometimes thousands) of applications for every position that they post. This creates a mountain of reading that recruiters just cannot do. Often, computers read your resume first and rate it based on how relevant it is to what the recruiter wants. Or, if you’re an overworked recruiter, you read really fast (i.e. 6-10 seconds per resume).

“Who” is a complicated question that gets to the core of our humanity. “What” is a lot easier to communicate. And in recruiting, it’s how we evaluate a candidate for further consideration. In this article, I want to get your resume from “Who” to “What.”

So Many Questions!

One of the hardest parts of the job search is knowing where to start. Full time work provides a location to work, equipment to work on, a community to support and direct you, and, in most cases, clear instructions on what to do on a day-to-day basis.

When you are seeking work, that can all go out the window very quickly. Job searchers must now turn inwards and answer a couple of deep questions.

  • What do I want to do?
  • What can I do?
  • What place (where) do I want to do it?
  • What do I expect from my work?

I have found these questions to be the most basic as well as the most troubling. I ask you to ask yourself, because every day that I’m at a job fair I ask job seekers, “what do you do?”

They say:

Entry-level job seeker: I can do anything!

Experienced job seeker: I can do everything!

Everyone Else: Whatever you want. I just need a job!

I get it…but I can’t help you know yourself. Before ever talking to a recruiter you should have an answer for these questions. We’ll take a deeper dive into each, but first you need to gather a few tools:

  • A copy of your resume you can write on
  • A pen
  • A highlighter

What do I want to do?

For just a minute, I want you to imagine a perfect world where you don’t need to work but instead just want to work. What would you do? I want you to ignore the lightness of your wallet and the anxiety you feel about being around the house all day.

You don’t need to get as granular as defining your job title, but you do need to narrow it down to a few things you want to do. For example, if I wasn’t working at Peak Performers I would enjoy:

  • B2B or technology sales
  • Digital marketing
  • Starting a board game company

But I’m going to make this harder. You now need to answer this question in three words or less. Write them at the top of your resume where it’s so big you can’t ignore or forget what you wrote. Go ahead…I’ll wait.

Here’s what I wrote:

What I want: Business Development / Recruiting

What can I do?

Now, write down a list that ignores your list of what you want to do. This list is for the things you can do whether you want to do them or not. Here’s where I want to you get really specific and list all of the things you can do. Here are some of mine:

  • Email marketing
  • Search engine optimization
  • Pay per click marketing
  • Direct to consumer and retail sales
  • Sourcing government opportunities
  • Writing requests for proposals and/or business proposals
  • Technical recruiting
  • Writing fun content like this!

By the way, this is the most important part to recruiters and companies. Many will train you, but they want you to come in being able to meet the minimum job expectations.

Guess what: now I want you to condense this list down to just three words. Maybe you can do a lot! That’s great, but what are your key skill sets? What would jump out to me as a recruiter? Write these skills down on your resume.

What I can do: Sales / Marketing / Recruiting

What place (where) do I want to do it?

The easy answer to this is “within a X distance drive.” Let’s include this and then go beyond the physical location. You should also consider things like a welcoming environment, a company with a social mission, a younger/older workplace, a progressive/conservative workplace, etc. These are going to be different for each individual. Here’s mine:

  • A company where I can directly help other people
  • A company where I can make the world a better place
  • A company within a 30-minute drive
  • A company that has windows visible from my desk from which I can look out
  • A company that is open with communication and feedback

In. Three. Words. Just three. Write them at the top of that resume!

What place I want: Austin / Positive / Sunshine

What do I expect?

Now we’re getting into the nitty gritty of the job details. Realize that expectations may have to be compromised, but it helps to write them down. Start with the most obvious expectation and the reason most of us go to work each day. Again, here’s my list:

  • I expect to make $XXXX
  • I expect XXXX kind of health insurance
  • I expect XXXX other benefits
  • I expect to have some level of autonomy in my day-to-day work
  • I expect to be valued for my creative contributions
  • I expect to work in a team-oriented environment
  • I expect to maintain a work-life balance

We expect a lot out of our work. As well we should. We spend a lot of time there! But get this down into three words.

What I expect: Autonomy / Compensation / Balance

Congratulations!

I’m sure up to this point you have followed my instructions very, very carefully. I have every confidence that your resume now has 12 words written on top. Right?

Here’s mine:

Business Development /Recruiting
Sales / Marketing / Recruiting
Austin / Positive / Sunshine
Autonomy / Compensation / Balance

This word list gives you a distilled look at what I’m looking for in a job, as well as a list of what I should present on my resume for best results. Now the real work begins.

Edit Your Resume

A common misconception is that resumes should be only one-two pages. A resume should be as long as it needs to be provided that:

  1. It accurately and concisely represents all of you
  2. Is long enough to thoroughly address everything that a job description asks for

We’re going to make a generic resume from which you can start. You will constantly be editing this resume for every single job for which you apply.

  • Highlight: I want you to highlight everything on your resume that points strongly to one of the words that is written above. It can (and usually should) be the word itself.
  • Circle: Anything that may be relevant for a job. Education is a good example; you may well need or should include it on your resume, but often the role you’re applying for does not explicitly require it. Often, these circled items will be listed on your resume but de-emphasized.
  • Cross Out: There’s probably a lot of stuff left on your resume. Cross it out. These are like hoarding shoe boxes or 1980s Christmas decorations or Beanie Babies. Channel your inner Marie Kondo and throw it out.

Respect Your Time

There’s an even more important reason you wrote down those 12 words. You need to make sure that all of your job searches focus on all or most of these words. You should not waste your time with “maybes.” In recruiting, when we look at your resume and think, “hmmm maybe,” that means no. That means we’ll put it off to the side and then forget about it because we’ll eventually find the resumes to which we say, “Yes, yes, YES!”

Getting to Who

You remember Who? Who remembers you and misses you dearly. It’s not that recruiters and HR managers don’t care about Who…it’s just that resumes are not the appropriate place for it. “What” is clear and objective. It’s also what catches our attention in a stack of resumes.

The interview is where you get a chance to show off your “Who.” I could tell you that I love to bike ride, I’ve traveled all over the world, I design board games, and I love to swing dance. You’ll get to know me as a funny, social guy who loves puns. Get to the interview by first answering “What.” If you answer correctly, the interviewers will love the “Who.”

Dude, where’s my job? Job seeking advice for recent grads!

Taking the next big leap: into the work world

So you’ve graduated—now what?  Maybe you’ve moved out on your own or maybe you’re looking to.  Maybe you’ve already got your foot in the door with an organization, or maybe you’re bussing tables to make ends meet.

Fear not—employers are looking for energetic and enthusiastic young people like you who are ready to change the world! And there are tons or opportunities out there for the eager recent grad.  

Here are 5 tips to help you get started:

  1. Start somewhere: it may not be your dream job right away, but it helps get you there.  Every job you get from making hamburgers to answering phones teaches you something about yourself and about your talents.  Don’t be afraid to try something new and make professional contacts along the way! (PS: Peak is a great place to start in entry-level professional positions.)
  2. Be flexible: chances are you’re young and mobile.  Take advantage of that. Your first or second job may be located on the other side of the country or maybe even in a different one—sounds like a fantastic adventure! Besides asking yourself when can you start…maybe ask yourself where you can start?
  3. More jobs offline:  You may spend most of your time online but your future employer may not.  Have you thoroughly researched a company before applying there? Have you looked for personal referrals and people who might know people?  Have you networked with anyone besides through Linkedin?
  4. Always follow up: even if you don’t end up taking a job after an interview, give the hiring manager the courtesy of a personal phone call or email to thank  them following an interview or offer. Be grateful for every opportunity whether it lands a job or not.  Always be positive, and leave the door open for future opportunities.
  5. Avoid job hopping: even if you don’t like your job, try to resist the urge to “job hop.”  A prospective employer may be less likely to consider you for a new position if they perceive that you are less committed and dedicated for the long-term.
  6. Pick yourself back up: it’s possible you will fall flat on your face or find yourself in a job that’s a terrible fit for your skillset.  Take note, learn from the experience, and move on. Your first job will likely not be your last—but you’re sure to learn a lot along the way!

Did you know we’re always hiring at Peak?  Have you read about what we do?  Start your career with Peak Performers by sending us your resume.

Over 50? Looking for a job?

5 Tips for Job Seekers over 50

It’s hard finding a new job or transitioning careers, especially when you might be thinking more about retirement.  Things can be extra challenging these days competing with tech savvy millennials who will work for lower wages and can relocate easily—however your future is still bright!

Here are 5 tips to compete in the job market!  (By the way, we’re always hiring at Peak!)

  1. Stay positive, stay current: Employers can sense energy and enthusiasm—they appreciate perspective but don’t want someone stuck in the past.  Make sure to stay positive and in the present both on paper and in person.  Remember that you want to highlight your past and not live in it.
  2. Get techie: Realistically, most of your work will be done on a computer from now on.  Most likely you already use a computer on a daily basis but maybe it’s time to learn some new skills.  It’s likely in your new job you will be using Google Docs, Quickbooks, Salesforce, or another cloud-based, collaborative application–so maybe it’s time to do some research and familiarize yourself with the software currently prevalent in your career field.
  3. Update your resume: Have you been in one job for ten years?  Twenty?  Probably time to update your resume.  Did you know that your local library may have resume writing classes?  Have you looked at resume writing tips online?  Also, don’t forget to tailor your resume towards each job you apply for.
  4. Link up—Linkedin: Linkedin is not only a great way to look for jobs but also to reconnect with former colleagues and friends in the field.  Many of your best job leads will come from personal referrals.  So tighten up that resume and get online to connect.
  5. Leverage your experience: you’ve been there and done that.  Don’t forget to show it on your resume and talk about it in the interview.  Most employers value experience, perspective, and a long list of things you’ve done.  While ideal resumes should be tailored specifically to the job you’re looking to get, don’t be afraid to point out all the ways you’ve changed the world!

By the way, have you heard about our mission at Peak?  Do you think you might be a Peak Performer?  Send us your resume!

Finding the job you LOVE

A note from our founder and CEO:

For many of us, growing up is a time of exploring ideas and our relationship to life – to others around us and the universe in which we live.  It’s a big and complex universe with an enormous number of choices to be made.  Many of us spend the first 25+ plus years of life just figuring out which choices will aid our survival the most (and which ones are most harmful).

Most schools emphasize getting to college as soon as High School is done and that often means entering the full time workforce at the age of 22, 23 or later.  And it can be a big parental (and personal) disappointment when you discover that you actually dislike the kind of work for which you have been trained – at enormous cost.  And if you graduate with debt the shock and disappointment can be personally devastating.

How can you know what you love to do, until you do it?

So finding the job, the work you love, is a bit tricky.  It’s a bit of a chicken and egg problem.  How can you know what you love to do, until you do it?  You may find that even the greatest job at the best company in the world can send you into your pillow crying if your boss is mean.  Or you may find the menial tasks of your chosen profession drive you to a boredom not experienced since Middle school.

The days of going to work for one employer in one city, in one trade or profession are gone.  The odds are very good that you will not work any one place for 30 years.  

Job sampling, and temporary work, in today’s “gig” economy is the most beneficial way for you to find out:

  • Where you want to work
  • What kind of work you really enjoy
  • How your skills can be best deployed to help an employer
  • How and where you get the most personal job satisfaction.  

Work is no longer just about the paycheck

For the first decade of working, I had no idea what kinds of jobs I loved, so I sampled multiple jobs, employers, and job types.  From highly technical and precise map making, to highly imprecise and social sales jobs. 

Prior to creating Peak Performers, I had jobs in…

  • A car wash, making dirty cars clean (until the next time it rained)
  • Mapping possible hydroelectric dam locations
  • Selling Persian, Turkish and other exotic rugs and expensive carpets
  • Selling electronic stereo equipment and home electronics
  • Mapping the back side of the moon
  • Analyzing the right level of staffing for large plywood manufacturing plants
  • Grinding steel plates in a machine shop (that lasted one day)
  • Selling insurance and annuity products to elderly people
  • Helping people with disabilities develop work skills
  • Helping minority and women owned small businesses get government contracts
  • Helping low income and minority workers get re-trained and placed into new careers
  • Helping older workers get trained to change occupations and helping minority youth access the workforce 

I finally settled on helping people with disabilities develop work skills as my ideal type of work.  That was after having 15 jobs!  Some lasting years and some only months.  

To give another example: our family dentist began his post-university career as an electrical engineer.  He is a highly social person who likes talking to patients.  Electrical engineering was not a good fit, to say the least.

No one really knows what they LOVE to do until they have done some various things.

No one really knows what they LOVE to do until they have done some various things.  Employers are no longer expecting you to give them your whole life and they are no longer guaranteeing you a lifetime job.  That’s a good thing for people seeking a well-balanced, happy and prosperous life because you don’t want to commit for the next 30 years either.

So, looking at the reality of today’s job market, all jobs are, in effect, temporary.  And you as a candidate can make the best of this opportunity to look around and sample different jobs, in different sectors for different employers until you find the job you LOVE.  

The whole box of chocolates might look inviting, but there will be one in the box that’s better than all the others.  It’s up to you to find it.

-Charlie Graham, founder and CEO of Peak Performers

Celebrating 27 years of the Americans with Disabilities Act

Passed by Congress in 1990, and eventually signed by President George H.W. Bush, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is the nation’s first comprehensive civil rights law addressing the needs of people with disabilities, prohibiting discrimination in employment, public services, transportation, telecommunications, and many other spheres of civil society.

The legislation provided many of the civil liberties and protections of the Civil Rights Act to people with chronic medical conditions. Prior to the ADA, job seekers with noticeable disabilities were very often dismissed for certain positions due to the erroneous perception that they could not perform the tasks at hand. It would be naive to say that workplace discrimination no longer exists, but it would also be remiss to discount the significance of the ADA.

Of all the obscure national days to celebrate, this is certainly one not to miss. And in honor of the landmark legislation, we created this infographic to highlight the impact it’s had on all of us.



Peak Performers is Austin’s preferred staffing and recruiting firm for contract work with State of Texas government agencies. As a non-profit, we also give job placement priority to candidates with a disability. To learn more about our company, please visit our website.

[fbcomments]

A recruiter’s review of 3 job clubs in Austin

Looking for work is hard. It’s even harder if you try to do it alone.

The job club model is designed to utilize the collective power of a group to help job seekers find and keep employment opportunities. Each group tends to have their own culture and flare, but they all typically include weekly meetings, networking, resource sharing and guest speakers who provide a wealth of information on the job search process.

Our recruitment team benefits from staying connected to various job clubs in Austin, and we thought we’d share some insider information on our three favorite groups in the area.


Background

According to the group’s official website, the Launch Pad Job Club (LPJC) was “created in 2001 and was facilitated by the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC). The job club was formed to support the thousands of unemployed tech workers who were displaced by the Dot Com bust.” During the last recession, attendance grew upwards of 300 weekly attendees. These days there are typically 60-80 job seekers and volunteers.

Full disclosure: Peak Performers is a sponsor of LPJC, but they did not pay us to write nice things about them. We actually paid them.

Atmosphere

It’s impossible to talk about this group without mentioning Kathy Lansford Powell. She founded and has galvanized the group since its inception. Her energy and enthusiasm have trickled down throughout the volunteers and programming alike. We’ve found that this tends to be a more experienced crowd with a wide range of skills and backgrounds. While the membership is professional and serious about the job search, the meetings tend to be fairly casual and light-hearted. You’ll want to stay alert though — recruiters often visit the meetings and lurk in the crowds.

Highlights

While there are several other job clubs around Austin, the LPJC can proudly say they were the first in Central Texas. Their signature program is called Leap to Success, which offers the talents of members to area non-profit organizations for free, short-term projects. This is a great way for job seekers to keep their skills fresh, increase their network and feel good about giving back to some incredible organizations in our city.

How to get connected

Contact   Website  Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter   YouTube

Meetings

LPJC meets every Friday, typically at the Millennium Youth Entertainment Complex in East Austin. Newcomers are encouraged to arrive by 9:30 for orientation, and the main agenda starts at 10:00 AM and usually lasts until noon.


Background

Like many groups across the country, the roots of what is now HiredTexas sprang up following the recession in 2008. It originally began as a career assistance group but has since grown into a full-service job club offering learning opportunities, job search assistance, peer support and a wealth of community connections. A full narrative of the group’s history can be found here.

Atmosphere

HiredTexas has a family-like and hospitable atmosphere, and new members are quickly welcomed and encouraged to get involved. The “5 pieces of inspiration” shared by the group facilitator help set the tone for a week of motivated job hunting. There is also a potluck networking lunch that occurs the second Tuesday of each month. HiredTexas meets in a church building, but there is no direct religious component to the programming.

Highlights

The group recently revamped their website, and we’re big fans of the clean look and updated content. They offer an abundance of resources, including unique forums designed to meet the needs of an evolving workforce. The personal marketing support forums include a Career Assessment, Marketing Plan, Resume, LinkedIn profile and picture, and Interviewing. Forums for Networking Effectively, Informational Interviewing, and Negotiating the Offer are in also development. They also offer free classes on Computer Fundamentals and the Microsoft Office Suite products. If you’re in need of motivation, you may benefit from joining a Career Action Team to keep your job search accountable.

How to get connected

Contact   Website  Facebook   LinkedIn  Twitter   YouTube

Meetings

HIREDTexas meets every Tuesday from 10 AM until 12:00 PM at Grace Presbyterian Church (Round Rock). The meeting is generally divided into three parts: guest presenter, networking, and various forums.


Background

The Austin Job Seekers Network (JSN) began as a ministry of the Hill Country Bible Church in 2009. Craig Foster is a dynamic and engaged leader, and he has grown the group to involve thousands of participants throughout the years. They are now an independent, non-profit organization offering a comprehensive approach to caring for the whole job seeker. JSN normally runs 90-100+ job seekers and volunteers each week.

Atmosphere

Prior to attending for the first time, our team heard many positive reviews about JSN from job seekers and recruiters alike. The weekly meetings are professional, interactive and full of positive, encouraging energy. Keep in mind that the meetings are hosted in a church building, and there is a clear religious component to the messaging. They are a faith-based group; however, people of all faiths are welcome to participate, and many do.

Highlights

According to a leading job search expert, JSN is considered one of the top 5 job clubs in the United States. The group offers compelling keynote speakers, small group training on a variety of job search topics and workshops on career direction and life calling. Our favorite thing about JSN is that they have a section of the running agenda dedicated to the “donut people.” When someone has good news to share (often in the form of a job offer), they bring a box of donuts to celebrate and offer their good news to the rest of the group.

How to get connected

Contact  Website  Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  YouTube

Meetings

JSN meets every Monday morning from 9:00 to 11:30 AM at the Hill Country Bible Church Lakeline on 620 near 183. Newcomers are encouraged to arrive twenty minutes early to sign-in and meet with a coach.


We can’t possibly list all of the resources associated with these groups, so you’ll have to check them out yourself. Each group is free to attend and all are welcome. We’d love to hear your own thoughts and experiences in the comments section below. Have you benefitted from the job club model?

 

[fbcomments]

Preparing for your interview at Peak Performers

Welcome to Peak Performers! We are Austin’s preferred staffing and recruiting firm for contract positions with State of Texas government agencies. As a nonprofit, we’re also driven by the mission to create a new standard of employment for qualified applicants with a disability.

We’ve compiled some information to help you know what to expect at your interview appointment. If you haven’t submitted your resume to be reviewed by our recruitment department, you can do so by clicking here.

Getting to Our Office (4616 Triangle Ave, Suite 405)

We are conveniently located in a commercial and residential development known as The Triangle, just off of North Lamar Boulevard. If you come at lunchtime, we’re auspiciously situated next door to Hopdoddy (although we recommend eating your burger after the interview). Our office is directly across the street from a five-story parking garage. There is free, accessible parking on the street and in the garage. We’re also conveniently located near stops for several major bus routes, including the 1, 801 and 803.

The Interview

The entire interview and registration process typically takes 1.5 to 2 hours. Prior to your arrival, you’ll receive an email with a link to our application paperwork. To save you some time, we recommend filling it out ahead of time. If you don’t have access to a computer, you’re also welcome to arrive early and fill it out at our office. Please keep in mind that the online paperwork takes most people 15-20 minutes to complete.

When you arrive for your appointment, you’ll check in with one of our friendly front office coordinators. While it’s not completely necessary to bring a copy of your resume to the appointment, it might be helpful if you have an updated or specialized version. If you’ve been invited for an interview, we most likely have a copy in our system already.

Once you finish the initial paperwork, you’ll interview with one of our staffing consultants so they can determine the best fit for your individual goals, skill set, and level of experience.

We recommend dressing to impress and being prepared for a professional interview. We are committed to using a fair and standard set of interview questions for each candidate. While we cannot guarantee job placement, our staffing consultants work hard to create the best match for you and the agency clients we serve.

During our registration process, you’ll be asked if you have a disability or chronic medical condition. We understand that this can be sensitive information and many people are reluctant to discuss their disability or medical condition (especially in an employment situation). Keep in mind that the answer you provide is completely confidential. At our company, we recognize that disabilities have little to no bearing on an individual’s skills and capabilities. In fact, we give a job placement priority to qualified candidates with a chronic medical condition.

Skills Assessments

Following the interview, be prepared to complete a standard set of computer-based assessments. These evaluations are important to help us find the right match for each position. If you’re not satisfied with your test results, we also offer free tutorials that can be completed at home. When you feel more confident, you can schedule an appointment to re-test and we’d be happy to use your best set of scores.

Becoming a Peak Performer

Once the registration process is complete, your information is then entered into our system. At that point, you are encouraged to text in your availability (512-453-8833) once per week. As we receive new job openings, our staffing consultants search our database for qualified and available candidates. If you are matched with a job, a staffing consultant will reach out to you to discuss the position in further detail.

Congratulations, you’re on your way to becoming a Peak Performer!

[fbcomments]

Sneak Peak: Featuring Tammy Miller

Welcome to Sneak Peak, our on-going series highlighting the career paths of our former associates – how they got started, what they’re doing now and what advice they have for current job seekers in the great city of Austin, Texas.

One of our Staffing Consultants recently reconnected with Tammy Miller over lunch. She is a gifted coordinator and administrative professional with a knack for getting things done. Tammy has the energy to consistently take on new projects, and despite having had no prior office experience, she has built a successful career with the State of Texas. She was generous enough to share a glimpse of her career journey in her own words.

 

How did you first hear about Peak Performers?

After 16 years of work in the retail industry, I wanted to change my career path, but I wasn’t sure how to transition my skill set.  A roommate suggested I connect with Peak Performers and try working as a temporary contract worker to see how I would enjoy office work.

What was your first assignment?

My first assignment was an Administrative Assistant II with the Texas Department of Human Services.  The people were great, and I found out that I enjoyed the office environment.  I made sure to exhibit good working habits and used every opportunity to learn all I could about the agency.  That temporary placement was a strong foundation for my career in state government.

What are you doing now?

While the agency has experienced a few transformations, I have remained within Health and Human Services for the past 17 years. I am currently the Advisory Committee and Outreach Specialist for the Early Childhood Intervention program.

What advice would you give to current job seekers?

Each assignment is one step toward reaching your dream. Be committed to the work, be willing to accept new opportunities, be accountable, and be flexible to the changes that will appear on your path.  Appreciate the opportunities, both big and small, and use them to develop and build skills to enhance your resume. Give your best to every assignment and never stop investing in yourself.

Thank you, Tammy, for sharing part of your story with us. We wish you all the best in your continued career with the State of Texas.

Peak Performers is Austin’s preferred staffing and recruiting firm for contract work with State of Texas government agencies. As a non-profit, we also give job placement priority to candidates with a disability. To learn more about our company, please visit our website.

 

[fbcomments]

Sneak Peak: Featuring Darwin Hamilton

Welcome to the inaugural post of Sneak Peak, an on-going series highlighting the career path of one of our former associates – how they got started, what they’re doing now and what advice they have for current job seekers in Austin.

 

Our Peak recruiters ran into Darwin Hamilton recently at a local community meeting. In a city becoming synonymous with gentrification and displacement, Mr. Hamilton is a 5th generation Austinite. He is also an active volunteer, community leader and board member for several local civic organizations. Darwin was gracious enough to share a glimpse of his journey in his own words.

 

How did you first hear about Peak Performers?

In March of 1998, I was referred to Peak Performers by a case worker with Project RIO of the Texas Workforce Commission. He mentioned that with my skills and resume, Peak Performers might be able to offer temporary job placement with the State of Texas.  

What was your first assignment?

My first assignment was with the Crime Victims’ Compensation Program at the Office of the Attorney General as a Data Entry Operator assisting their accounting department with filing records and mail merging address labels for benefit letters to claimants.  My contract was originally for 90 days, but it kept being renewed. I used my time on that assignment to teach myself 10-Key by touch, update my knowledge of Microsoft software applications, and gain viable office skills and on the job work experience to meet minimum qualifications for Admin Tech classification positions the state had available with the Attorney General’s Office.

What are you doing now?

Today I’m a Senior Accountant III and interim lead of Accounting & Finance – Internal Operations Division of the State Office of Risk Management.  I began working for this agency in May of 1999 as an Accounting Clerk.  It is where I made my career and this May will be 18 years that I’ve spent working for the same agency.

What advice would you give to current job seekers?

The advice I would give current job seekers is to never give up hope, and to be confident in your capabilities and potential. Use every assignment opportunity to do your very best and build a rapport and social capital with some of the people you work with because those very people may one day advocate for your permanent employment with a state agency.

Thank you, Mr. Hamilton, for sharing part of your journey with us. We’re grateful for your presence and service in the community, and we wish you all the best in your continued career with the State of Texas.

Peak Performers is Austin’s preferred staffing and recruiting firm for contract jobs with State of Texas government agencies. As a non-profit, we also give job placement priority to candidates with a disability. To learn more about our company, please visit our website.

Cover photo is used by permission from Texas Advocates for Justice and Grassroots Leadership.
[fbcomments]

5 tips to make the most of your next job fair

Job fairs can either be an incredible networking opportunity or an incredible waste of time. Like most aspects of the job search, thorough preparation and strategic follow-up are crucial to success. Here’s how to make the most of your next event:

Come prepared. Once you find out what companies will be present, do some additional research to help prioritize the ones you’d like to target. Don’t waste your time talking to companies that are obviously not a good fit. Check the company websites for specific job postings you find interesting and apply online ahead of time. It’s always important to update and bring printed copies of your resume or any other materials you might need.

Memorize your stump speech. Remember that you’re indirectly competing with everyone else who attends the event. Tell an honest, but unique story, and prepare to say it over and over again. You’ll want to quickly and clearly communicate who you are, what skills you can offer and some specifics regarding your ideal scenario.

Be a professional. Arrive early to ensure that you’re able to meet with each company you’re targeting. We recommend treating each interaction just as you would a traditional job interview. Dress to impress. Be enthusiastic. Stay engaged. Give a firm handshake. Even though job fairs tend to be more casual than interviews, be careful not to overshare information about your health, personal opinions or political affiliations. And try not to be that person who mulls around and takes all the tchotchkes without making eye contact with anyone.

Make your time count. As you interact with recruiters, try to collect as many business cards as possible. Ask good questions, and try to make small connections with people so you can reference it later when you follow up. If you’re standing in line waiting to talk to a representative, study the company literature or listen to the conversations going on in front of you to glean as much information as you can. It’s also important to be nice to everyone, including other job seekers or event staff. You never know what interaction might make (or break) your next opportunity.

Follow up and follow through. Taking copious notes during (or immediately after) the event will help you organize your next steps. You’ll want to remember names, titles, contact information and any additional instructions on how to follow up. It’s also helpful to jot down any personal connections you make with recruiters (i.e. shared hobbies, sports teams, alma maters) so you can be sure to include this in your follow up correspondence. Send a brief email to each person you met. Here’s a very simple template to get you started:

Subject: From [your full name]: Nice to meet you!

Hi [first name of recruiter],

My name is [your name], and we met today at [recruiting event]. I just wanted to thank you again for sharing your experience and for providing information about your open positions.

As discussed earlier, I’m very excited to explore further opportunities with [company name]. I really appreciated your time and helpful advice.

I’ve also attached my resume for reference, and a few of the projects I mentioned as well. Please let me know if there’s anything else you need on my end. I look forward to connecting again soon!

Best,

[Full Name]
[Phone Number]

And don’t forget to join us on Wednesday, February 1st, for our next internal job fair. For more information, check out our event page here.  If you’re interested in keeping an eye on our open positions, you can also subscribe to updates here.

Help wanted: Join us for a job fair!

Join us for our February open house and internal job fair! We’ll be conducting the application process from start to finish, so come prepared for an interview and bring a copy of your resume. For a list of our current open positions, please visit our website. Register below to reserve your spot now. We’ll see you there!

New to Peak Performers?

We are Austin’s preferred staffing and recruiting firm for people interested in contract employment with State of Texas government agencies. As a nonprofit, our mission is to set a new standard of employment for people with disabilities and/or chronic medical conditions. We provide short and long-term contract positions for government agencies looking to fill positions ranging from administrative support to highly skilled Accountants and IT professionals. 

  • Health Insurance with 80% employer paid premiums!
  • No placement fee! Our client can hire you anytime without a penalty.
  • 22+ years of experience working with the State of Texas.
  • All of our positions are W2.

Visit our website to learn more about who we are and what we do, or submit your resume ahead of the job fair by clicking “apply for this position” here.

Bonus tip: To save time when you here, you can also download and bring your completed application with you.